Log In | Subscribe | | |

Legal Profession

It's all becoming a little too Orwellian. When the previous, Labour government created the "Ministry of Justice" it sounded more 1984 than we were comfortable with. After all, the whole point of the various ministries in the book is to deliver the opposite of what their name promised. Recent changes to costs are removing access to justice except for those that can pay.

And it's all building up to look like a raid on solicitors' firms.

CoNet Section: 

An administrative Court in the UK has issued a warning to solicitors that it will require the attendance before it of the solicitor having conduct of a case plus the senior partner of the firm to give an explanation as to why applications are made late, are incomplete or have no merit - and, if it is not satisfied with the explanation - to publicly name them.

CoNet Section: 

The biggest revolution in the English legal profession is under way. Not only does it appear that the Bar is carefully managing to take back its previous control of advocacy in the higher courts, new schemes to register approved advocates in some lower courts are dividing the solicitors branch. But these pale alongside the chances that have allowed solicitors practices to incorporate under a Limited Liability Partnership structure and to take in private equity.

CoNet Section: 

The Legal Services Board, an industry body representing and - after a fashion - regulating lawyers in England and Wales, is to propose to The Lord Chancellor that will-writing and post-mortem legal services should be "reserved" - that means only those falling within the scope of the LSB's supervision should be allowed to do them. That's going to cause a near riot. And it may be another nail in the coffin of small firms.

CoNet Section: 

New York law firm FARUQI & FARUQI, LLP specialises in class actions, especially those where it alleges misconduct in relation to securities which, it usually claims, leads to a significant fall in share prices, thereby causing losses to shareholders. It's frequent press releases call upon those who held shares in companies at relevant times to join in the action they hope to mount and to get paid on a contingency basis. But all is not rosy.

CoNet Section: 

Mexican company Grupo Mexico S.A.B. de C.V. is more than a little peeved. Its US subsidiary Americas Mining Corporation applied to the Delaware Supreme Court for "re-argument" as to legal fees in the case of Americas Mining Corporation, et al., v. Michael Theraiult, as Trustee for the Theriault Trust, No. 29, 2012. The court said "no" and in doing so has demonstrated the conflict of interest inherent in contingency fee ("no win, no fee") arrangements.

CoNet Section: 

The Law Society of England and Wales long ago began a system of registering those that wanted to demonstrate they met certain criteria. It was a voluntary quality assurance scheme. It was, at the time, seen as a bit of a waste of time by professionals who had extensive experience and new what they were doing, a way for the second rank to gain credibility that they did not, fully, deserve on merit. Gradually, the idea mutated away from a marketing tool to part of regulation and it is now a compulsory registration of specialists in certain areas. The latest to fall under the compulsory requirement is Solicitor-Advocates. And disturbingly, many have not signed up with only days to go.

CoNet Section: 

It's probably not a great idea for me, an English solicitor (retired) to be publicly harsh about my professional body. But, seriously, is the Law Society of England and Wales contrary or comatose? It really just does not "get" money laundering risks and its latest attempt to update its guidance demonstrates that its attitude is, simply, retarded.

CoNet Section: 

A US Judicial Conference Committee has updated the model set of jury instructions federal judges use to deter jurors from using social media to research or communicate about cases on which they serve. The new guidelines provide detailed explanations of the consequences of social media use during a trial, along with recommendations for repeated reminders of the ban on social media usage.

CoNet Section: 

The Solicitors Regulation Authority, which regulates solicitors in England and Wales, is to cease development of a database of retired solicitors who wish to remain on the Roll. Apparently, the Roll a costa lot.

CoNet Section: 

The bribery was the least of the worries of California lawyer Alfred Nash Villalobos, 46. It was the reason he was paid USD50,000 that really annoyed prosecutors and the Judge.

CoNet Section: 

Dewey Ballentine was one of the bluest of blue chip law firms. LeBoeuf, Lamb, Greene & MacRae was an upstart that grew rapidly and gathered large clients like a farmer gathers hay. In 2007, the firms decided to merge creating Dewey & LeBoeuf, one of the largest law firms in the world. Yesterday, it put itself into the hands of receivers under the USA's Chapter 11 provisions.

CoNet Section: 

A lawyer, formerly with Baker & McKenzie in New York has pleaded guilty to money laundering and conspiracy to commit securities fraud while with the firm.

CoNet Section: 

The Law Society of England and Wales is mounting one of its biggest PR campaigns ever as HSBC, one of the largest residential mortgage lenders in the UK says that all its mortgage work is to be handled by only 43 firms.

CoNet Section: 

James D Levitt is 66 years old and facing serious jail time. Aside from his latest conviction, he's behind on payments on a prior criminal conviction in respect of which he still owed more than USD400,000.

CoNet Section: 

Pages

 


 

Amazon ads

| |

 

hahagotcha