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Personnel management

Every since someone tried to draw a distinction between weekly paid "workers" and monthly paid "staff" there has been a search for an all encompassing term for the people who work for a company. The term "personnel" works perfectly but as personnel departments grew and personnel officers gained seniority (which was a good thing) they decided they needed a grander name so they called themselves "human resources" in a manner than, ironically, dehumanised the staff. The next trend was to refer to staff as "human capital," further removing them from being real people and treating them as assets. We believe in people. We say people should be treated as humans and treated with dignity. So we insist on using the term "Personnel" and those who regard their own job titles as more important than the people they serve can like it or lump it!

The USA's Internal Revenue Service has, for some time, been warning corporations of a spam-scam targeting companies. But now, it says, it has evidence that it is spreading into "school districts, tribal organizations and non-profits." and other sectors. But that's not all: the criminals have found a way of hitting the same targets twice.

Editorial Staff

US President Donald Trump issued a number of diktats (sorry, Executive Orders) on his first full day in office. But one is likely to greater impact : a blanket freeze on recruitment at all federal offices.

Editorial Staff

While it is always dangerous to base any legal analysis on general media reports, media are reporting a case which provides sufficient fact for a discussion of the principles involved. The case involves a member of staff at a branch of Tesco in Ireland who removed product from the premises and was dismissed but has been awarded substantial damages for unfair dismissal.

Editorial Staff

One of the things France has been so very proud of itself for is that it not only brought into force the maximum 35 hour working week required under the EU's Working Time Directive (no one else did) but actively enforced it with squads of inspectors checking how long employees' cars were in office car parks. France has, however, admitted that it didn't work. But even so, why was it necessary to pass a law to say that employees have a legal right to refuse to answer office phone calls, deal with messages including instant messaging and emails out of office hours? Isn't that common sense?

Harvey Andrews: The Pocket Song...

Editorial Staff

 


 

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