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Politics and Economies

Long before his inauguration, US President-Elect Trump telegraphed a view of ethics and corruption that many consider contrarian. Is the Trump way of doing business to allow tacit approval of under-the-table deals or is it simplifying the legislative regime, putting corruption on the same footing as any other financial crime? There is justification for his abolition of the Rule requiring minerals companies to report large payments to foreign governments: it was under the wrong Act and it didn't go far enough. Perhaps inadvertently, Trump has just set the stage for the first true test of his character. Also, there is another shock that biased reporting has not made clear...

Nigel Morris-Co...

A Parliamentary Bill in the UK goes through several stages: first the knockabout (if MPs are awake) in the House of Commons. Then it goes to a Committee Stage and then to the House of Lords. Although those bodies cannot, in effect, cancel the Bill, they can send it back to the Commons for various purposes. With cross-party support, the Bill passed with 498 votes to 114. That was closer than many would have liked.

Editorial Staff

While much of US President Trump's first days in office have been signing off on relatively easy to accomplish Orders delivering on some campaign promises, his big things remain protectionism and the Mexican Wall. He's found a way to deal with both in one way after Mexico told him that his plans to make them pay for a wall would hit, well, a wall.

Editorial Staff

Those who think that the people who brought the action and the Judges who found in favour of the Complainants simply do not understand: if they want to blame someone, blame whoever stuffed up Bill that provided for a Referendum.

Editorial Staff

People who turn up at US embassies around the world and want to see the Ambassador are in for a long wait: many ambassadors appointed under Obama have had the call from Trump's people. They said "you've been fired."

Editorial Staff
Editorial Staff

We continue our look at Theresa May's speech setting out her position and plan for the UK to leave the EU.

Editorial Staff

It's taken Theresa May months to pop her head up and make clear statements about the UK's exit strategy for separation from the EU. There have been hints, partial statements, but there have been no clear policy statements or expressions of exactly what the plan is. This week, she changed that.

And she demonstrated that, at last, she "gets it" so far as the LEAVE vote is concerned.

In this first of a series of highlights from the speech, we explain, with comments, where, on the May plan, the UK, the EU and much of the rest of the world is going.

Editorial Staff

Diplomats are expert at couching hard truths in soft language, a trick that leads to ambiguity. There's not much of either in the letter Sir Ivan Rogers left for his staff when he left his post several months early so that he was no longer there when negotiations for the UK to leave the EU start in earnest. In Whitehall, this morning, there will be more bloody noses than pulled punches - but Whitehall has a treacle-like approach to criticism. Standard operating procedure is to hang-around until the fuss dies down, then carry on as before.

Editorial Staff

There are few people who do not believe that man is causing harm to the planet and that global warming is a significant part of the problem. However, the specific causes of both global and localised warming are hotly debated, even though some of the results are now beyond doubt. The problem might not be the message: it might be the messengers.

Editorial Staff

Donald Trump is not yet in the White House but he's already flexing his muscles. Already at odds with the State Department, which issued an official apology to China because Trump directly spoke to Taiwan's President, Madam TSAI Ing-wen, he's not only unrepentant but, for a man who has a history of casino ownership, he's doubling down on what might be the biggest gamble of his own Presidency, even though he's not President yet.

Editorial Staff

In an unprecedented display of authority over its president, the South Korean parliament has voted to impeach President PARK Guen-hye, in part because of allegations that she was under the influence of a non-elected person. What now?

Editorial Staff

The televised hearing before the UK's Supreme Court is fascinating, but difficult to follow.

Nigel Morris-Co...

Donald Trump, as President-Elect of the USA, has been criticised for his lack of clarity and purpose in setting out policies. So he's announced that, on his first day in office, he will withdraw the USA from the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a deal between 12 countries that, together, control an estimated 40% of the world's economy. It does not include China. However, what Trump may not realise is that what he sees as a populist move in the USA echoes what many ordinary people around Asia think of the deal.

Editorial Staff

The political posturing that has arisen from the High Court in England and Wales ordering that Article 50 can be triggered only after a Parliamentary vote is ridiculous. Then again, so was the bringing of a case, or the need for one to be brought. Anyone with an ounce of sense always knew that last June's Referendum does not bind Parliament (voters were told that often enough during many TV and Radio programmes and many articles in the media in the period leading up to the referendum) therefore a Parliamentary vote would be required. Anyone who thought otherwise was delusional and lacking in basic knowledge of the fundamentals of how the British legal and parliamentary systems work.

Nigel Morris-Co...

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