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scam

On several occasions recently, our filters have picked up e-mail from a company promoting itself as "5mins" and, as is common, offering directory services. But this one is a little different. No matter what, the target is in a lose-lose situation, which is odd because on so many levels, the mail appears to be acting both properly and legally. But there is just enough that isn't right to raise suspicions - and the UK's Information Commissioner's Office, which is responsible for the implementation of the new GPDR regime and is already having a hard time handling the scaremongering that's almost as bad as Y2K.

CoNet Section: 

A form of scam spam has come to our notice this morning. It is unusually convincing and clever.

It purports to come from Scotia Bank's secure e-mail service but, obviously, it does not.

Details below.

CoNet Section: 

In recent weeks, we've seen a significant number of spam-scams from a domain that is remarkably similar to an official UK government domain, showing that registrars and hosts are failing to identify obviously fraudulent customers. The fraudulent domain name is close enough to the real thing to fool many targets.

CoNet Section: 

There's rarely anything new in Spam Scams but the letter that purports to come from "Investigation and Enforcement Services" and carries a (not exactly correct) UK Government Copyright Notice is novel. Read the full mail below.

CoNet Section: 

In the past few hours, a high-volume phishing scam, purporting to be from Bank Negara Malaysia, has hit inboxes. That is it a scam is without doubt: the outgoing addresses are all, in common with many such scams, .edu addresses. They contain a PDF file, BNM.pdf, as an attachment which does not trigger anti-virus warnings when it is delivered to inboxes.

BIScom Subsection: 

Fraudsters rely on illusion. They depend on showing you something so that you do not recognise a truth that they want to obscure.

Many fraudsters are clever, many are well prepared, but the vast majority are opportunists ..

CoNet Section: 

An email purporting to come from Apple's iTunes frightens victims into clicking on a malicious link - it tells them their credit card has just been hit with a large charge.

CoNet Section: 

A fraudulent e-mail headed "Alert! Your email will be blacklisted soon" and purporting to have been sent by an address at spamcop.com is circulating.

CoNet Section: 

There are, it seems, almost no limits to how dumb internet fraudsters can be. In these two examples, the most dimwitted are at their hilarious best. (update: three examples)

CoNet Section: 

It's an oldie but a goodie, rather like that phrase much beloved of DJ who used to spin the disks in the 1960s and 70s. There's a massive upsurge in an old-fashioned internet fraud / money laundering scam - and the morons doing it have sent multiple copies to sandbox addresses at World Money Laundering Report, our sister publication and other companies within The Anti Money Laundering Network.

Way to go!

FCRO Subsection: 

Scam e-mails are nothing new and usually they are so boring they don't even register. But "Woolcock" paulwk@gmail.com 's "Money Transfer" scam mail is so amusing it justifies being included in the Fraud Hall of Fame. By the way, it was sent to an e-mail address at "countermoneylaundering.com." Twit.

BIScom Subsection: 

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