Log In | Subscribe | | |

Linux Mint : Number Lock on Start Up

Editorial Staff

Linux is almost infinitely configurable. For those used to offerings from Microsoft Windows or Apple OS, that's either great or scary. It also means that many things that users of those systems take for granted don't come in the box while many things that are fiddly or time consuming with those work without any intervention.

Issue: Caps Lock is OFF on Start Up by default.

Solution: quick and easy.

There are two primary methods for downloading programs - one is through the recently developed "shop" concept using the kind of graphical interface that users of on-line app stores are used to or, much simpler and faster, is to use the command line.

The command line is found in the "Terminal" window. In most fresh installations, it's the thing that looks like a turned-off tv in the panel, which (former?) Windows users will know as the "status bar."

Click to open. You need to type into that window. Paste doesn't work. But don't worry: the commands aren't complex.

Now: resolving the issue -

in Terminal type

sudo apt-get install numlockx

press enter (or the carriage return key), and when prompted insert your password and press enter again.

The tiny program will be downloaded from the official repository and automatically installed.

Close the Terminal window.

Then go to Menu > Administration > Login Window and select the Number Lock On option.

There are no buttons to accept or apply. Close the window to store your options.

And that's it. Done.

---------------- Advertising ---------------- Cleaning up the 'Net - An Action Plan to combat the use and abuse of the internet for financial crime Paperback.

--------------------------------------

Tags: 

 


 

Amazon ads

 

When a loved-one dies, we don't know how to feel, we don't know how to react and we don't know how to behave. "Ten Things You Need To Know About Dealing With Death" is a quick and easy description of ten simple "Rules" that guide you through the grieving process, in the immediate aftermath of a death, in a practical and sometimes humorous way.

 

More information