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Regulation

When Barnaby Joyce admits he was wrong, as he has done recently over his previous comments that a Royal Commission was appropriate to inquire into the management and practices of Australia's banks, it's obvious how things are going. It's starting to look as if the sector is going to get a huge shake-up - and the removal of many senior officers. One hopes they are replaced with competent bankers, not more recruits from consulting companies - or from the revolving door with government and quasi-government jobs.

Nigel Morris-Cotterill
BIScom Subsection: 

A correspondent asks "As a UK individual how do I report / alert the US authorities to the a craptocurrency used by employees and the Chairman of a group of companies with offices in St Louis, Missouri ?"

Here's the answer, and it explains differences between OFAC and FinCEN, etc. reports.

Nigel Morris-Cotterill
BIScom Subsection: 

Titled "PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE DFSA’S ANTI MONEY LAUNDERING, COUNTER-TERRORIST FINANCING AND SANCTIONS REGIME," the consultation paper was issued on 18 February 2018 and the consultation period ends on 24th March 2018.

Notes by Nigel Morris-Cotterill, The Anti Money Laundering Network

Nigel Morris-Cotterill
BIScom Subsection: 

In this article, Ajay Shamdasani , Thomson Reuters Regulatory Intelligence, takes soundings on what might be expected from the FATF's Mutual Examination of Hong Kong, the results of which are expected soon.

Editorial Staff
BIScom Subsection: 

Financial adviser Drew Grosskreutz of Queensland, Australia, has been banned from providing financial services for three years, says ASIC

Editorial Staff
BIScom Subsection: 

This article, by Nigel Morris-Cotterill, was first published in September 2002. It is, in part based on a briefing to banks, etc, in London in November 2001 and draws attention to the effect of the money laundering, etc. provisions of the just in-force USA PATRIOT Act.

Nigel Morris-Cotterill
BIScom Subsection: 

The ICO, or initial coin offering, is causing furrowed brows at regulators. It's a fascinating concept and governments are split: should they regulate it on the hoof or, as China has done, ban it until they can work out what do to about it? Or should they pretend it's not happening?

All three approaches are being adopted.

Nigel Morris-Cotterill
BIScom Subsection: 

Binary options are a simple concept: they pay a fixed return, or nothing. It's a bit like a KickStarter campaign: if you hit the target, you get your money, if you miss it, you don't. But with binary options, the risks are different: fail and you lose your investment. So, there's another way of looking at it: it's a bet and if you lose, you lose your stake, so it's not like an ordinary option where you might still get back some of your original investment. For sophisticated investors and financial adrenalin junkies, they are fine. For everyone else, they are very high risk. Aussie regulator ASIC says that risk is rarely properly explained, and often it is not explained at all.

Editorial Staff
BIScom Subsection: 

If someone describes themselves as an "expert" or a "thought leader" in relation to, let's say, financial crime or FinTech or even on-line banking, ask them this - and don't give them time to look up the answer: "what's Q-Coin?*" And, is Second Life about to get a second chance as a potential money laundering vehicle?

Editorial Staff
BIScom Subsection: 

Quietly, almost under the counter, the UK's Financial Conduct Authority is preparing itself for life outside the EU with a raft of agreements directly negotiated with regulators around the world.

Editorial Staff
BIScom Subsection: 

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