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Politics and Economies

Today's big news from those out to defeat Trump (as if he's not doing that all on his own) is from the New York Times. It's an interview with a woman named as Jessica Leeds who the NYT describes as "a businesswoman" who, in a videotaped and carefully edited video, with several TV production-style overlays to emphasise key phrases, says she was a travelling sales rep for a newsprint company in the 1980s when she was invited to move from economy to first class on a flight. "I didn't need to be asked twice," she says. But there are signs that the video might have been staged.

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Economists are lining up to say that the Republic of Ireland's astonishing 26% growth in GDP has no meaning, in the great scheme of things. They are wrong and this is why: Ireland attracts high-value added businesses because of its commitment to low income and corporate taxes that most of the EU, the USA and Australia want it to change.

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Stay Calm and Do Business. The "Remain" camp remain in "Project Fear" mode and are busy talking down the economic prospects and talking up differences into divisions. While the President of the EU and German politicians are trying to take control, there is one - and only one - reality that needs concern anyone, whoever and wherever they are, today. The result of the referendum did one thing and one thing only: it provided that, at some point in the future, the UK will cease to be part of the European Union. But that is not today, it is not tomorrow and it is not for a minimum of two years. Moreover, the UK and only the UK is in...

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Thank you, Britain.

The UK has voted to end its full membership of the European Union in a referendum, although the result has, at the time of writing, not been formally announced, the losers are actively working to create divisions within the country and turning to hostile rhetoric to foster their own agendas.

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Today, the UK votes on whether it has a future, or whether it will become a sub-state of a federal Europe.

That is the simple, blunt choice facing the electorate. Everything else is secondary.

Worse, the secondary arguments which have clouded the issue have been presented largely as unsupported threats to individuals or the state. If the "REMAIN" camp have almost nothing but negative pressure and promises that history shows cannot be kept, surely they have already lost their right to be trusted.

There are, quite simply, insufficient rational reasons for the UK to remain. For you, your children, their children and the country,...

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David Cameron, speaking in Japan where he is attending the G7 Summit, has said that the young, in Britain, should register to vote. He says it may be the most important vote of their lives and it is for them to decide what kind of country they want to grow up in and their children and grandchildren to grow up in. He's exactly right.

And when they do, they should vote to leave the EU. This is why. And as someone who supported the "yes" vote in 1975, I start with a mea culpa, says Nigel Morris-Cotterill

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We've got a second chance to prevent the abolition of Britain and England in particular. We must not waste it.

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If there is one day that we should be proud to be English, it's today. It's St George's Day and it's the day chosen to celebrate Shakespeare's 400th Birthday.

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There is a media flurry as ill-informed media organisations jump up looking to unsettle governments by showing that national leaders have used off-shore vehicles for asset protection and tax avoidance. Some may also have used them for tax evasion. In addition to politicians, business leaders and ordinary families are revealed as using such techniques. But behind the over-excited and sometimes inaccurate reporting, lies a remarkably unremarkable story that starts with a theft of confidential data.

If data were goods, then the media would be dealing in stolen property.

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Column

It's easy to write off the Democrats as divided also-rans even as they are trying to make the most difficult decision of their party's history. The debate they don't want to have is this: who are we going to try to put in the White House, a woman or a Jew?

Trump, in the meantime, sits in the simple position that he's an intellectual minnow compared to the others, that he has no relevant experience, that his hairdresser is better than Sanders' but worse than Clinton's - and he speaks to the base concerns of REDnecks, WHITE Christians and BLUE collar Americans. His very irrelevance is carrying him through.

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