Log In | Subscribe | | |

Financial Crime News

A very funny story in today's South China Morning Post reminds me of the many hilarious tales of my Hong Kong Police mates about vice raids. The anonymous tourist who bemoans his fate in the article is an example of what happens if you think that being a foreigner absolves you from the important action of switching on your brain and learning at least something about what you are getting yourself into, says Nigel Morris-Cotterill

FCRO Subsection: 

The sentencing to three years of those involved in a case involving bank loans to a company that then defaulted gives some indication as to why Vijay Mallya is so reluctant to return to India from his UK hideaway.

FCRO Subsection: 

 

courtesy Australian Federal Police - arrest 201612 Take a moment to slow down so you can understand the scale of this: the Australian Federal Police have seized a shipment of cocaine that is 1,100 kilos.

Let's put that into perspective: bags of sugar come in 500 or 1,000 gramme packs. Imagine walking home from the supermarket carrying ten big bags.

Now imagine trying to get 110 times that past customs on the way out of a country, then on the way into another and to avoid detection at various way points in between. A diverse and difficult to identity group very nearly managed it.

 

FCRO Subsection: 

When we found an advertisement for illegal downloads of Sun Tzu and the Art of Litigation, we wrote to everyone that public records showed as connected to the issue or hosting of the domain. We found, again, that Cloudflare was at the heart of the illegal operation and therefore being paid to provide services to criminals who may be generating profits for organised crime or for material support for terrorists. FCROs must consider the business practices and risk management models of their customers because, by definition, banks are receiving, harbouring and distributing the proceeds of criminal conduct received via those companies.

FCRO Subsection: 

Just last weekend, one of our people received a call late at night. An Indian voice asked him for details of his credit card and for his security question. That call was genuine, from his bank's fraud department, but for an estimated 15,000 US taxpayers, the department calling was all about committing not preventing fraud.

FCRO Subsection: 

The European Commission (EC) has decided that the European Union (EU) system of Directives isn't working when it comes to money laundering and terrorist financing. They are right. What's taken them so long to work it out? The question is this: have the identified the correct matters and will they get it right this time?

FCRO Subsection: 

"Banks will have clearer guidance on how to best manage risks related to money laundering and the financing of terrorism...in correspondent banking," says the Bank of International Settlements' Basel Committee.

FCRO Subsection: 

Artur Samarin is a name that will (or should) live on in the annals of infamy as someone who simply sidestepped all government and other identity checks to move to and openly live in the USA for four years.

FCRO Subsection: 

The USA's Securities and Investment Commission pays a share of fines that it receives to those who blow the whistle and a financial penalty results. In August, the second largest award made so far brought the total payout to more than USD100 million.

FCRO Subsection: 

The State Bank of Pakistan has long listed, in a schedule to anti-terrorist legislation, a number of proscribed groups. On 25 September 2016, a Sunday, the first day of the working week in Pakistan, it issued a notice to banks (but only banks) instructing them to freeze the assets of more than 2,000 named persons, individuals and entities, which it says are directly linked to the proscribed groups.

FCRO Subsection: 

On or about 2 May, Indian businessman Vijay Mallya left India for the UK to spend more time with his family. Meanwhile, investigations into his financial dealings have continued and, in late April, Indian authorities issued a warrant for his arrest and revoked his passport. He is not, however, stateless: a passport is a document evidencing the right to travel and its revocation does not affect his Indian citizenship. Where do such cases leave financial institutions?

FCRO Subsection: 

The first Senate hearing into the "alleged" money laundering of USD81 million stolen from the account of the Bank of Bangladesh with the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and transfered to accounts with Rizal Commercial Banking Corporation (RCBC).

FCRO Subsection: 

A remarkably simple phishing spam may be one of the most successful at gathering debit card data and therefore giving access to bank accounts.

FCRO Subsection: 

If it's got lies in it, it's a spam and putting an address or unsub link doesn't turn lies into truth. But really, one should be able to trust someone promoting "bible verses," right?

Nope.

FCRO Subsection: 

It's an oldie but a goodie, rather like that phrase much beloved of DJ who used to spin the disks in the 1960s and 70s. There's a massive upsurge in an old-fashioned internet fraud / money laundering scam - and the morons doing it have sent multiple copies to sandbox addresses at World Money Laundering Report, our sister publication and other companies within The Anti Money Laundering Network.

Way to go!

FCRO Subsection: 

Pages

hahagotcha