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I've been embroiled in a bit of a dust-up with a couple of people over a reply I made to a comment on a post on LinkedIn. The original question was actually interesting and I looked forward to a fascinating discussion around it. But what it proved to me was that we have a major problem with language where technical terms are used in a non-technical manner and those using them are not aware of the risks that using the terms can bring. One, which has long been a bug-bear of mine, is "partner." Let's be very clear about this: in business terms, a partnership is not something to be entered into lightly or wantonly. Get it wrong, and the...

Nigel Morris-Co...
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The Australian Financial Services (AFS) Licence of a financial adviser in Brisbane was cancelled yesterday but the announcement was made first thing this morning Sydney time . Today, at least one LinkedIn profile says that the company holds an AFS licence proving that social media and due diligence are not good bedfellows. The case also shows that penalties for failure to comply with orders by regulators to undertake more effective management can have serious repercussions.

Editorial Staff
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Here we are at the last part of this five part series on reform of Formula One from 2020 to improve the spectacle, decrease the cost (and so allow more entrants) and to keep the competitive spirit alive for both the manufacturers' and drivers' championship, while not touching on the commercial aspects of the sport.

To read the previous four parts, click on 2020 Vision in the tags list.

Bryan Edwards
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When internet security is talked about, it's usually either that someone is trying to sell you something, or something has gone wrong in the biggest possible way.

But it's all OK for your bank, etc. isn't it. After all, you trust your systems to Amazon's AWS cloud service and if anyone's got internet security taped, it's going to be Amazon.

Right?

Wrong......

Editorial Staff
BIScom Subsection: 

We ended last week noting the problem of "marbles," those small bits of rubber that fly off racing tyres and line the track. There is nothing good about marbles, although there is an argument that the cause of marbles is potentially a good thing.

Bryan Edwards
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While aero helps the car at the front of a queue to remain stable both in a straight line and under braking, and it helps the car behind to go faster using less power, that's the only good news. Aero creates a range of problems for both cars and, if there are others behind the second car, those problems are compounded.

In Part 3 of Bryan Edwards' look at a 2020 vision for F1, aero is both hero and villain.

Bryan Edwards
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The judgment in the AUSTRAC -v-Tabcorp civil case is a landmark: it's the first civil case that AUSTRAC has brought to a conclusion in court. But the judgment is only the latest step in a long running investigation and series of regulatory actions against the ASX-listed gambling giant.

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Editorial Staff

It's amazing to think that companies that are known by a specific brand don't own the domain name you first think of. Some are still on the market, some are in the hands of others for a variety of reasons, including being parked at Google-owned SEDO which collects ad revenue when people make the mistake of entering the obvious.

Here are five domain names that, in some cases, don't belong to the people you think they would.

We reproduce below, unedited, the full text of two announcements by US-CERT, the US government cyber security office, relating to the HIDDEN COBRA virus which contains information in addition to that previously published.

Editorial Staff
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Today, the US cyber security office, US-CERT has issued a renewed warning about HIDDEN COBRA which it describes as a "spear phishing" virus.

What does that mean?

Editorial Staff
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The following e-mail addresses are associated with potential phishing or drive-by malware attacks this morning:

davidibe718@gmail.com
J.Ryan@hud.ac.uk

Editorial Staff
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Bryan Edwards examines Formula One, explains some of it in very simple terms and suggests ways to improve the racing. Continued from Part 1 yesterday.

Bryan Edwards
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One has to ask what took so long.. after American regulators and prosecutors began attacking European banks for failures in the USA European regulators remained surprisingly reticent about taking action against foreign banks, especially American banks. While it may not be blowback (US banks have long gone their own way in London, as have German and Japanese banks but there have been occasional action against those) it is certainly time that US banks were not treated as a special case. In the latest example, Merrill Lynch has been ordered to pay a penalty that, relative to the scale of the failure and corresponding penalties in the USA, seems relatively small.

Editorial Staff
BIScom Subsection: 

In this series, Bryan Edwards looks at the state of Formula One and comes up with some radical ideas that could be brought into effect as soon as 2020 and would actually reduce the cost of the sport while improving the spectacle and technical benefits outside F1.

Bryan Edwards
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The US Surpreme Court has granted an order of certiorari which sends back to the district court the case of National Institute of Family and Life Advocates v. Xavier Becerra for review. California's bizarrely named Reproductive Freedom, Accountability, Comprehensive Care, and Transparency (FACT) Act is defended by Becarram California's Attorney General. and the plaintiff is a campaigning group claiming that the FACT act is unconstitutional. The case has made a monumental decision, at federal level, about religion and abortion and contraception.

Editorial Staff

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