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ChiefOfficers.Net

Let's be clear: I've lived in Malaysia, I love Malaysia, I'd like to live there again. It's a wonderful country full of absolutely lovely people (with a few crazy exceptions) and in the ten years I lived there it began to restore its fortunes as a regional leader, a position it had somehow lost in the 1980 until the mid 1990s. Amongst its crowning achievements was the astonishing Sepang circuit. But, due to a succession of errors of judgement, this amazing place managed to lose its pole position as the regional home of motor racing, surrendering without a fight to newcomer Singapore which doesn't even have a track but has a can-do, will-do attitude that seems to have completely eluded...

Bryan Edwards
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China is working incredibly hard to reduce its pollution problems, especially in the north where cold air and industrial outputs conspire to produce thick, choking smog. A stroll around any Chinese city these days will demonstrate the country's commitment to the development and production of electric vehicles. There has been announced a ban on the production and/or import of petrol and diesel powered cars "in the near future" and some say this could be as early as from 2020, Aside from European and Japanese hybrids and the expected re-emergence of Volvo as an electric-only brand, what else has China been working on. We have photos...

Peter Lee
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A passenger who built his own mobile phone charger has been released by police in India. It had been identified by airport scanners as a possible bomb.

CoNet Administrator
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Two days ago, the New York Post published here an article reporting that Google had demanded the removal of an article critical of its policies and then, seemingly, removed all search entries relating to it. Yesterday, we received a threat from Google to remove advertising from PleaseBeInformed.com because, they allege, an article "violates" their terms of service. But it's a dictionary listicle showing five differences between English and American terms...

Editorial Staff
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A job advert on LinkedIn is incomprehensible. The posts advertised are for writers.

Editorial Staff
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Like so many developers of so-called artificial intelligence, Google is proud of its efforts and, yet, once again AI has proved that it is often a failure waiting to happen. But this example is ever funnier - and more worrying. Someone has manipulated it and the target, amazingly, is people working in e.g. banks. Should banks, etc. now ban Google Alerts?

Editorial Staff
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ASIC has disqualified Kathleen Whittle of New South Wales from being an approved self-managed superannuation fund (SMSF) auditor.

Editorial Staff
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While many recognised the successes of Michael Schumacher, he was never a hero to generations: his achievements were simply a target while those of e.g. Clarke, Senna and a handful of others were as much a matter of folk-lore as numbers. These, like Jenson Button and Filipe Massa had drawn adoration, even love. Lewis Hamilton currently holds pretty much every record there is to hold in Formula One but the status of icon eludes him. How come?

Bryan Edwards
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When we launched PleaseBeInformed.com, one of our fundamental principles of design was that only those who we had taken reasonable steps to identify and verify would be permitted to post, even to comment. That decision was at the heart of our plan to charge a small annual membership fee, paid by credit card. While American-based social media networks spread across the world with more and more fraudulent accounts, China, it is reported, is taking steps to combat the use of social media for financial and "news" fraud, for that is what fake news and scurrilous social media comment is, at their heart.

Editorial Staff
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My grandmother, who worked in a police station, used to say "you know when you are getting old when policemen look young." It's strange to realise that many of today's senior people in offices have never known a world without the internet or a phone in their pocket.

Jefferson Galt
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On several occasions recently, our filters have picked up e-mail from a company promoting itself as "5mins" and, as is common, offering directory services. But this one is a little different. No matter what, the target is in a lose-lose situation, which is odd because on so many levels, the mail appears to be acting both properly and legally. But there is just enough that isn't right to raise suspicions - and the UK's Information Commissioner's Office, which is responsible for the implementation of the new GPDR regime and is already having a hard time handling the scaremongering that's almost as bad as Y2K.

Editorial Staff
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Years ago, there was a cliché phrase that seemed to be repeated far too much: "a little knowledge is a dangerous thing." We need to relearn this for the benefit of society as a whole and for business in particular as comment-lite and narrow opinion is promoted as the norm across the whole spectrum of media.

Nigel Morris-Co...
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The scandal over contaminated eggs originating in the Netherlands raises a serious question about one of the fundamental principles of the EU: the free movement of goods. Without taking sides one way or the other, we point out why this issue may be about eggs, but its ramifications are about something far more.

Here's why it's ironic that Brussels is in Belgium.

Editorial Staff
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The proof of Al Jazeera's mission to produce and broadcast material containing truths that many would prefer to keep secret is in the fact that it has become the poster-boy for the motto "you know you are doing something right when everyone hates you." As more and more pressure is brought to bear on a news network that is, today, a beacon of balanced reporting, even more than the now frequently partisan BBC, Al Jazeera finds itself the bit of news that produced an unguarded admission: Israel is working towards becoming a regional power by political collusion with several Arab states. It's a back-door assault on the GCC and, through that, the Arab League. That's not something Israel would...

Nigel Morris-Co...
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"The largest marketplace on the Darknet—where hundreds of thousands of criminals anonymously bought and sold drugs, weapons, hacking tools, stolen identities, and a host of other illegal goods and services—has been shut down as a result of one the most sophisticated and coordinated efforts to date on the part of law enforcement across the globe." So says the USA's FBI. And it is seriously impressive. But, quietly, another investigation, led by Dutch authorities, has done far more damage to the deep web than closing down Alphabay.

Editorial Staff
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