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Malaysia is no stranger to the type of aircraft accident where a plane skids off the runway. It's barely news because low speed slithering in very wet conditions puts the plane part way onto the grass and after it's been towed out and the undercarriage checked, it's back to business as usual. So why has Saturday's incident at Sibu take so long to clear and why is there concern to ensure a "thorough investigation"?

Editorial Staff
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There is a delicious irony in seeing Jorge Lorenzo's arrival at Ducati going from bad to worse: he capitalised on and ridiculed Rossi's dalliance with the Italian team joining it only after all the hard work had been done, or so it seemed. But a dismal qualifying and a failure to get round the first corner (which in typical style Lorenzo sought to blame someone else for) coupled with Rossi's average qualifying and scintillating race performance shows that karma is often right.

Bryan Edwards
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Norway's sovereign wealth fund, Norges Bank Investment Management (NBIM) part of the Norwegian Central Bank, is reported to be "by far the largest in the world" and it's not happy with declining returns on its investment. Companies, it says, are granting salary and bonus packages that deplete companies' resources and promote short-termism in management. It says that C level executives should be properly remunerated but that dashing the cash isn't the way to do it.

Editorial Staff
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There are two questions to ask about the Solicitors' Regulatory Authority's action in relation to solicitors company Asons: the first is whether it was a "South Korea" moment - where there were so many questions, that they had no choice and secondly, if those questions had merit, how has it taken so long? The bottom line is that suspicious activity and behaviour was utterly rife: why do regulators adopt a lower standard in this area than they expect those they supervise to adopt in relation to money laundering?

Editorial Staff
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The power of one individual to cause massive disruption by the abuse of a religious slur has been demonstrated by loss of an estimated GBP100,000 in just one month by BATA, Malaysia. It's just the latest in false or ludicrous accusations in the country by a small minority claiming to be protecting Islam and causing division, dissent and a major sense of humour failure.

Editorial Staff
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Without identifying the people involved, we look at several cases of people who have found it difficult to get jobs despite their obvious skills, qualification, loyalty and dedication.

Editorial Staff
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We've had the Arab Spring and we've had various anarchist and anti-globalisation, anti-capitalism and even anti-wealth protests around the world in the past ten years but there is a new, culturally valid, development. It would be wrong to call it a movement but there is a discernible trend: protests against corrupt governments. It started in Malaysia with the Bersih movement but it has gained traction when, in South Korea, the demonstrators were highly influential in removing President Park. The latest country to see such protests is Russia. The most fascinating aspect is that the protests are cross-party, combine left and right: they are true people's movements, carefully targeted.

Editorial Staff
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It is, perhaps, ironic that one of Ferrari's most ardent supporters, Bernie Ecclestone, isn't the boss of F1 any longer as the Prancing Horse danced its way into the first victory of the 2017 F1 Grand Prix season in Melbourne, Australia.

Bryan Edwards
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Qualifying for the Qatar MotoGP race was cancelled due to bad weather. 24 hours later, the race itself was delayed for half-an hour and then, when the riders went out on a sighting lap, several concluded that parts of the track were too wet to even attempt turn 14. Then the Stewards sent out Laurence Capirossi to check. It was a weird situation.

Bryan Edwards
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Now the cars have arrived at a proper race weekend, we can at last see what the cars look like, hear what they sound like and get some comparative data on this year's cars against last year's. And we can see what might be not quite right and that's a long list.

Bryan Edwards
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The pilot of a Bombardier Challenger 604 executive jet has reported that his aircraft suffered "significant loss of altitude, abnormal flight attitudes and accelerations beyond the certificated flight envelope." Damage was substantial. It is reported that a large freighter passed at approved separation (the distance between two aircraft in flight) but that there was significant turbulence resulting. It is said that the freighter was an Airbus A380.

Editorial Staff
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It's proof that no one, no matter how good, can guarantee that there are no IT security risks in their products. US-CERT, the US government body that reports risks discovered in products, has its usual raft of Adobe and Microsoft products in this week's list but there is a surprising entry: data security company F-Secure, a recognised leader in the field, has made an appearance, too.

Editorial Staff
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The USA's Federal Reserve Board is planning to fine and issue prohibition orders against two former Managing Directors of J. P. Morgan Securities (Asia Pacific) Limited. It follows on from the Board's fining of the bank in November 2016. The offence? Excuse us while we choke on our own laughter: giving jobs to the boys. But they did it in China. On Wall Street, it's standard operating procedure, as it is across a wide range of industries in the USA. There are several matters of grave concern to Banks regulated by the Federal Reserve Board, both domestic and foreign.

Editorial Staff
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The Geneva Motor Show is the place where many companies put out their wilder concept cars. But Airbus has turned up with a concept that actually works in practice but is likely to have even more hurdles to legal use than driverless cars. It's.. well, it defies simple description but one thing it isn't is a car that flies and another thing it isn't is a flying thing that travels on the roads.

CoNet Administrator
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A leader in The Economist echoes the official position of, in particular, the USA in saying that "the Iraqi Army is on the brink of defeating Islamic State." In what sounds like a dangerous reprise of the claim that the war in Iraq was won, the assumption that clearing Mosul of this criminal gang will rid the world of its dangers is, and was always going to be, wrong, says Nigel Morris-Cotterill.

Nigel Morris-Co...
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