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ChiefOfficers.Net

So far, recounts in the US Presidential election have either been abandoned or resulted in an increase in the majority for Donald Trump. The allegations that Russians somehow infiltrated the voting systems in the USA remain entirely unproven. Today, the allegations are irritating but, ultimately, no different in principle to the tirade of false information on social media. Set that against the express and clear comments of a senior Israeli diplomat saying he would "take down" UK ministers and others in what should have caused a storm but didn't.

Nigel Morris-Co...
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The continuing saga of South Korean president PARK Geun-Hye is gripping the South East Asian nation while the rest of the world looks on with mild interest and wonders just how many kinds of kimchi there are. To ignore it would be a mistake.

Editorial Staff
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The conviction of a man for destroying mobile phones containing evidence in a bribery case raises issues that go far beyond the immediately obvious.

For details of the case, see Jail for destroying mobile phones containing evidence (Subscription)

For the reasons that comms devices must now be a Board issue, read on..

Nigel Morris-Co...
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Manor Racing, which is already in its third iteration (Virgin, Marussia, Manor) in five years, is unlikely to start the 2017 season unless some serious investment or a buyer of its engineering arm can be found very quickly.

Bryan Edwards
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What does Donald Trump have against Mexico? It's rapidly turning (in places) into a lawless state where violence associated with the drugs trade is driving more and more refugees across the border into the USA. So he wants to build a wall (or so he has said). But it's the economic policies that he's openly planning that will turn Mexico into a failed state with the risk of internal conflict emulating civil war. If he's not careful, he's going to end up with a Syrian style exodus just across the Rio Grande.

Editorial Staff
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Diplomats are expert at couching hard truths in soft language, a trick that leads to ambiguity. There's not much of either in the letter Sir Ivan Rogers left for his staff when he left his post several months early so that he was no longer there when negotiations for the UK to leave the EU start in earnest. In Whitehall, this morning, there will be more bloody noses than pulled punches - but Whitehall has a treacle-like approach to criticism. Standard operating procedure is to hang-around until the fuss dies down, then carry on as before.

Editorial Staff
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One of the things France has been so very proud of itself for is that it not only brought into force the maximum 35 hour working week required under the EU's Working Time Directive (no one else did) but actively enforced it with squads of inspectors checking how long employees' cars were in office car parks. France has, however, admitted that it didn't work. But even so, why was it necessary to pass a law to say that employees have a legal right to refuse to answer office phone calls, deal with messages including instant messaging and emails out of office hours? Isn't that common sense?

Harvey Andrews: The Pocket Song...

Editorial Staff
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In "The Edge of Madness," Michael Dobbs (of "House of Cards") fame writes of a mad senior officer in China who, off on a frolic of his own, creates a team of hackers who break into infrastructure projects all over the world, causing enormous damage and dangers. It was published in 2008. And when the Washington Post published an article saying that an electricity company in Vermont had been hacked and Russian code found, demonstrating the vulnerability of all systems, including the USA's national grid, Dobbs' novel seemed prophetic. But the Washington Post made up material parts of the story.

Editorial Staff
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This is a bit weird: criminals have created an Android virus that resides in users' phones and hacks into wifi network routers, then it does devious and harmful things.

Editorial Staff
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There are few people who do not believe that man is causing harm to the planet and that global warming is a significant part of the problem. However, the specific causes of both global and localised warming are hotly debated, even though some of the results are now beyond doubt. The problem might not be the message: it might be the messengers.

Editorial Staff
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The news has become so driven by rapidly changing stories and sound-bytes that serious issues are increasingly hidden away or barely reported. One such issue is Egypt's resolution before the UN Security Council which condemns Israel's illegal settlement building outside its UN approved borders. Outgoing US President Obama, with only days remaining in an unremarkable double term in leadership, had made it known that the US intended to abstain, a radical course of action : historically, the US votes against any vote critical of Israel. But the vote has been postponed and the first signs of future President Trump's foreign policy have been telegraphed.

Editorial Staff
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in Understanding Suspicion in Financial Crime Nigel Morris-Cotterill* says that only three facts are needed for the genesis of suspicion.

Now, with the acquisition of LinkedIn by Facebook, three US companies know far more than three facts, actually almost everything, about you, wherever you are in the world. Move over NSA: the Google-Microsoft-Facebook axis of evil is the real threat to personal privacy and security.

Editorial Staff
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It's a surprise to many to learn that the USA places restrictions on how much individuals are allowed to pledge in crowdfunding campaigns. The maximum is small and it's in total, not per project.

Editorial Staff
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Nico Rosberg is this year's Formula One World Champion, and he picked up his trophy, then told the audience at the FIA dinner that he was retiring.

Bryan Edwards
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A note of personal sadness: long, long ago, this writer was considering his future. At the top of the list of highly professional firms that attracted him was Mallesons in Hong Kong. But a family discussion resulted in staying in London and taking a radically different approach. The hankering remained but the shine is wearing off as the now global association of practices is heavily in debt, shedding staff and trying to hive off offices and teams.

Nigel Morris-Co...
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