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Headline: Lewis Hamilton has won 10 races this year, Nico Rosberg has won 9. Hamilton won in Abu Dhabi, Rosberg won the championship. Hamilton has had a disproportionate number of mechanical and electronic failures but he's also had a propensity to ruin his own starts. But, even so, Hamilton does seem to have been hard done by and even his team has, from time to time, been a little less than even in their support for their two drivers.

Bryan Edwards
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21 races across five continents and barely time for the teams to breath: for the mechanics and technicians, strategists and skills we never see, who commit their lives to F1, this morning the morning most of them, on a personal level, have been waiting for. They are going home and, after the trucks get back to base and everything is put into its locker, they can go home and see families that have been largely neglected for the past eight months or so. But for one person it's a eulogy, for three people it's the end of an era.

Bryan Edwards
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On 23 November, the Council of the EU published a set of "conclusions" of the council and Representatives of the governments of Member States on "the prevention of radicalisation leading to violent extremism." If there was ever a subject that was more fraught with danger in relation to definitions and concepts, it's hard to think of one. But the conclusions are based on a premise that is very familiar:that criminals aren't to blame for their actions - it's society's fault.

Editorial Staff
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While looking around the web, all kinds of things come to light. This, from Irish national broadcaster RTE's news website might not be what they hoped would be visible. And, to you, when you visit the page, it isn't.
CoNet Administrator
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Today, The Guardian carries the following headline: "Historian finds German decree banishing Trump's grandfather " Doing a websearch for it produces hundreds of copies of cutting and pasting of the headline and the article, or significant chunks of it. It's time that search engines were made responsible for the consequences of their promotion of breaches of copyright, says Nigel Morris-Cotterill

Nigel Morris-Co...
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Donald Trump, as President-Elect of the USA, has been criticised for his lack of clarity and purpose in setting out policies. So he's announced that, on his first day in office, he will withdraw the USA from the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a deal between 12 countries that, together, control an estimated 40% of the world's economy. It does not include China. However, what Trump may not realise is that what he sees as a populist move in the USA echoes what many ordinary people around Asia think of the deal.

Editorial Staff
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In Malaysia, the Inspector General of Police, KHALID Abu Bakar has been forced to deny a story that has gone viral on "social media" that huge parts of the capital, Kuala Lumpur, will be closed to traffic from 5 am to 6pm on Saturday. Already, shopkeepers have made plans to close for the day.

Editorial Staff
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Der Spiegel, a German newspaper, has spotted a footnote in the activities of the German parliament. A vote in the upper chamber, the Bundesrat, was the venue for a statement that it wished to see a ban on new petrol and diesel powered cars by 2030. Will it and can it take effect? Read on for one of life's most wonderful ironies - and no, it's not the one about Germany inventing the internal combustion engine. Don't worry, DTM lovers: you are not about to be cast into the wilderness.

Editorial Staff
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In the UK, there is an epidemic of advertising and other forms of marketing by companies who then pass leads to firms ( which, these days, are often companies not firms) of solicitors. Their advertising is annoying and sometimes misleading; but there are practices that are downright unethical and borderline (or perhaps over the border) illegal. Can the practice be prevented? Perhaps it's time to wind back the clock on fee sharing.

Editorial Staff
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Michael Hughes explains that innovation only takes hold when someone else joins in: then others see a trend instead of an isolated freak.

Editorial Staff
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Mark Zuckerberg has still not quite got a handle on what it means to run a public company. He announces policy on the hoof and before even Facebook's Press Office and even the markets are informed. His latest whoopsie relates to suggestions that Facebook carried sufficient "fake news" to influence the 2016 US Presidential Election.

CoNet Administrator
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It all started as a bit of propaganda. Young Chinese who were not in settled relationships were fed up with being marked out as being a bit "odd." So they announced "Singles' Day" (a day for singles) to celebrate the fact that millions of Chinese are, well, single. Retailers, in the mid-year doldrums after all the various festivals have finished and with several months to go to Chinese New Year, got behind the idea with special offers and promotions. Within a couple of years, aided by the fact that the target audience is tech-savvy, it's turned into the world's biggest shopping day, dwarfing even the famed "Black Friday" in the USA.

Editorial Staff
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Mahmoud Daher, an employee of The Australian Securities and Investment Commission (ASIC), has today appeared at Downing Centre Local Court charged that he effected unauthorised access to restricted data and uttering a false document contrary to money laundering, etc. law.

Editorial Staff
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The political posturing that has arisen from the High Court in England and Wales ordering that Article 50 can be triggered only after a Parliamentary vote is ridiculous. Then again, so was the bringing of a case, or the need for one to be brought. Anyone with an ounce of sense always knew that last June's Referendum does not bind Parliament (voters were told that often enough during many TV and Radio programmes and many articles in the media in the period leading up to the referendum) therefore a Parliamentary vote would be required. Anyone who thought otherwise was delusional and lacking in basic knowledge of the fundamentals of how the British legal and parliamentary systems work.

Nigel Morris-Co...
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We spotted this Samsung advert right inside the main door of a large electrical shop in Kuala Lumpur several weeks after the Galaxy Note 7 was recalled and just after airlines started banning it from flights.

Editorial Staff
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