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FinancialCrimeRiskOfficers.com

The Journal of Clinical Investigation is a genuine scientific journal.

However, fraudsters have used its name to attract attention to a rogue website.

Tyrome Lewis, who organised and led a gang with the media-nickname "the Oxy-Bandits" that committed 15 armed robberies of independent “mom-and-pop” pharmacies throughout Southern California, has been sentenced to 240 months in federal prison. He was convicted earlier this year and sentenced yesterday.

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The Carbolic Smoke Ball case gave carte blanch for businesses to lie so long as they didn't go too far.

But that related to the efficacy of their products.

Here's an extraordinarily blatant lie that is so common that it's a surprise that it's not stamped on as a matter of policy.

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adviserangelo0@gmail.com (Advisor Angelo) writes under the subject line "VERY URGENT!!!!!!!!!"

Obviously, one has to pay careful attention to such a missive.

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The situation in Afghanistan is appalling. Exactly how appalling, we cannot know unless we are present. As journalists fly in, report from the tarmac or, in one case, from just outside the airport gates as bullets flew, we get a multitude of one-dimensional pictures that create a collage but not a cohesive whole. Stories of abuse are rife but on the other hand so are stories that the Taliban is far from the version of 20 years ago. All we can say is that the situation is extraordinarily complex, dangerous and it's likely to become far, far worse.

In the middle of all of this, a mail arrives. It's headed "Urgent request from Mohammed."

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In a criminal prosecution brought by the Australian Securities and Investment Commission, ASIC, the financial regulator, two out of five criminal charges brought against an alleged fraudster were dropped because the witnesses in those cases became "unavailable." The charges related to conducting an unauthorised financial services business and to soliciting moneys which were used improperly.

Nevertheless, the accused has pleaded guilty to the remaining three charges at the door of the court before his trial commenced yesterday.

It's a long and convoluted story across years and jurisdictions as well as various enforcement agencies.

The USA is, at the best of times, very good at shouting that it's a leader in combating money laundering but it's all mouth and no trousers, most of the time.

Take, for example, the noise it has made about so-called "beneficial owners" of companies, a misuse of the term that goes back to, at least, 1980s Senate Hearings into the laundering of the proceeds of drugs trafficking and the use of shell and offshore companies. 40 years on, the USA has still done nothing about it and all the signs are that nothing is going to happen soon. ADDENDUM: Comment by Jim Richards.

Here's the irony: FinCEN doesn't need to build and maintain a database at all, especially as the law restricts access to the data it holds, so voiding any KYC benefit it may have across the world.

This is a far from infrequent occurrence. In fact, it happens so often that it falls into that hole where due diligence and newsworthiness do not collide. So as a news outlet, we pay less attention to it than we would if we were a provider of due diligence information. Here's a round-up of recent announcements from the HKMA.

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Sometimes the headlines just write themselves.

Like this one.

Mary Margaret Kreuper, 79, of Los Angeles, was charged yesterday with one count of wire fraud and one count of money laundering. In a plea agreement Kreuper has pleaded guilty to the two charges that carry a maximum statutory penalty of 40 years in federal prison.

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I am so blessed. This chap has purloined money from a cryptocurrency account and wants to send it to me. So he chose an address at antimoneylaundering.net.

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If you were to receive mail from a government URL, you'd give it the time of day. Everyone would.

But this fake investment scam uses an address owned by the government of Paraguay as its spoofed "from" address. And, of course, it uses a free any anonymous e-mail address to collect responses from its victims.

And behind the spam-scam is a far more sophisticated scheme. We scrape away the stinky stuff and lay bare the fraudulent scheme.

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How often do you read something and find out that it's not what you thought it was when you started?

For all those that leapt on "Melbourne" - it's almost certainly not the one you were thinking of.

Melbourne, Florida is where this story is developing.

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If you want to be ripped off, e-mail the following:

*NAME: MR MARTIN COOK
EMAIL: **martincoookuk@gmail.com*
or martincoookuk@sim.it

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Marc Antrim, 43, of South El Monte, and others walked into a marijuana warehouse in Los Angeles and walked out with half a ton of weed and USD600,000 in cash. Then they distributed the drugs. Antrim was a police officer and one of his co-accused was an employee of the warehouse.

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There's an actor called Zachary Joseph Horwitz. He's also known as Zach Avery. He lives in a place called Berverlywood. Honestly. It's not Beverly (sic) Hills and it's not Hollywood. Actors, at least the good ones, are skilled at creating an illusion. What you see is not supposed to be real.

So what happens when an actor takes those skills away from the stage? The answer is... he gets arrested for fraud. And then the Federal Bureau of Investigation gets excited and issues a media release worthy of a hyperbolic - and grammatically dubious - studio. But under that, there's actually a good story.

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