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The Australian Federal Government last night passed the Treasury Laws Amendment (Enhancing Whistleblower Protections) Act 2019. It applies to those making authorised disclosures in a "regulated entity" and a far wider range of releasing information than is common This is part one of a series.

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Aw, bless, as they say in London's East. This scam is just so funny it's sad. It's supposedly from a central bank. Guess who's?

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Yet another case of false and fraudulent billing under the USA's Medicare system demonstrates how easy it is for medical practitioners to defraud both national and insurance-backed medical funding providers in the USA and elsewhere. Benjamin Rosenberg, D.D.S., 58, of Los Angeles, pleaded guilty to a sample count of health care fraud before U.S. District Judge John A. Kronstadt of the Central District of California. Sentencing will take place on May 23 before Judge Kronstadt. There weren't many big insurance companies he didn't defraud.

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Spammers have long been involved in directory fraud of one sort or another. Just as in the days of paper, letters are carefully phrased to make victims think they must make a payment. Then, hidden away at the bottom of the page is a note saying "this is not an invoice" and something along the lines of "you only have to pay if you want the service." These days, the spam-scammers also include something to tell you that they are complying with the USA's spam facilitation Act, mysteriously known as the Can Spam Act. And this one doesn't even tell victims what service they are supposedly subscribed to.

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We, the people, are discriminatory. You , me, he, she are all guilty of one of the most fundamental forms of discrimination. Yet, if we reject that attitude, we become better at so many things. Importantly, it all comes down to two fundamental prejudices. And, if you are a LinkedIn user, it's almost certain that you exercise it with every visit. Read on for why your New Year's resolution should be to reject this particularly unwise way of life.

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The facts of the case are just odd. The recipient of a bribe has been jailed and ordered to pay a fine of five times the amount of the bribe. But it's what the bribe was for that beggars belief

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Just because a CFO has his hand on the cheque book doesn't mean he can write cheques for anything he likes.

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The Australian Consumer and Competition Commission has been looking at how prices at petrol pumps move, with changes taking place in what, on the face of it, seems in concert. But, the ACCC says, there is in fact no evidence of collusion: it's simply price-watching and price-matching between operators. And if consumers take advantage of hints, there could be an enormous injection of discretionary spending from disposable income or a reduction in credit card debt across the country.

The news, then, is that what might have been suspected as a crime is not a crime at all.

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There is a fascinating case before the US Supreme Court relating to confiscation of assets used in furtherance of a crime as distinct from proceeds of criminal conduct. Oral argument took place last week and there is a transcript and recording here:

https://www.oyez.org/cases/2018/17-1091

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This morning's collection of spam raises several issues that should interest an extremely broad range of people across organisations.

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It's a spam, it uses Standard Chartered as a hook to entice victims to be defrauded, and it's hilariously awful. Note phone number +447452282904 and email address lrbernal@easynet.es and that the reply is to privacy e-mail service ProtonMail at taxmattersjon@protonmail.ch . But the most interesting thing is this: the e-mail provider easynet.es correctly identified this as spam, even as " advance fee fraud (Nigerian 419)" - then allowed it to pass. Is the provider complicit if anyone becomes a victim?

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The fraud is old hat. The bitcoin address is, presumably, valid and enforcement agencies may wish to track and attack it. And, of course, any financial institution which has records of it should identify it as a suspicious account.

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It's that time again: PayPal spam-scam time. But even by the standards of badly constructed spam-scams, this one is bad. So bad it's funny and so bad that anyone who falls victim to it may just be too stupid to live. But the bigger danger is that it's not a phishing scam but a way of placing malware on victims' computers and if that happens they are being human not stupid.

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It's a story that has grabbed the headlines - a week after it was first published. One suspects that there was much fact-checking going on before a New York Times article that says US President Trump "participated..in outright fraud," a statement of such extraordinary bluntness that the mere fact that it appears in print is at least as shocking as the allegation itself. There are so many things to consider but in FinancialCrimeRiskOfficers.com, we are interested in a relatively narrow aspect of the story...

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Identity fraud is usually a relatively unsophisticated operation. Usually, but not always. Kenneth Gibson of Reno, Nevada, USA, was not a usual suspect.


Image courtesy USA FBI Las Vegas field office.

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