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World Money Laundering Report

There is suspicion, belief and knowledge. Then there is wilful blindness and, finally, sheer bloody mindedness aka stupidity. A solicitor was warned that her client should be the subject of proper KYC / CDD and her research showed a clear connection to alleged criminal conduct. She went ahead with the multi-million deal anyway and made no suspicious activity report. The fine might seem small and some would argue she should have been jailed but, as the first solicitor to be prosecuted for this conduct, the importance of the case comes not from the penalty but from the fact that it was brought at all, and that it was successful.

Ah, Shreveport. It's one of those picture postcard towns that seems more suited to a Nicholas Sparks novel or a Hallmark TV romance than to intrigue and dirty dealings. But...

The risks to financial institutions, lawyers and accountants presented by their venture capital clients has long been recognised. But what of the risks that venture capital providers face as a result of their investments? WMLR identified a range of risks for both angel investors and those with a full VC involvement.

For the second time recently, a matter before the Solicitors' Disciplinary Tribunal in England and Wales has considered the use of a firm's clients' account for the provision of quasi-banking services. The SDT is starting to impose more substantial penalties and has clearly had enough of solicitors who fail to comply with their obligations under counter-money laundering laws and regulations. Like in the first case, the solicitor concerned is elderly and one might say that he might be considered as having carried on long-standing practices in the face of changing practice requirements and culture.

Aside from giving Digital Currency Exchanges a TLA (three letter acronym) AUSTRAC has sidestepped all the "is it, isn't it?" fuss in so many countries and stated the obvious: because digital currency is "money" in the economists' sense of the word, anyone operating an exchange is subject to the same rules and regulations as anyone operating an exchange in fiat currencies. But here's the surprise: the requirement to register with AUSTRAC and to put in place money laundering, etc compliance and risk management systems comes into force today. And the notice was only published this morning. Moreover, there is an unexpected consequence for the mainstream financial sector.

When assets are frozen, seized, confiscated or, in the case of ships and aircraft, arrested, there is one major difficulty for the lawyers and state bodies obtaining those Orders. . Unlike state sanctions, those obtaining the Orders have no simple route to bring their Orders to the attention of persons, be they individuals or entities, that may be holding assets to which the Orders relate.

Today, with the launch of GlobalKYC by World Money Laundering Report, all that changes.

The days of Easy Rider are numbered. Around the world, gangs of criminals on motorbikes (colloquially but (usually) legally incorrectly called Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs) have, quite simply, gone too far and as they have become the face of organised crime, usually in large, sparsely populated countries, they are being targeted. While the Hell's Angels have been held up as a model, the gangs are rarely truly members. But while, these days, many Hells Angels groups are filled with ageing lawyers, bankers and wannabe bad boys, the current crop have taken over the worst traits - and business practices, investing in businesses, property and with a raft of professional advisers on retainer. One regulator has had enough and put metaphorical chains on the doors of a law firm.

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Includes:

World Money Laundering Report

White Collar Crime Case Studies

Global KYC (read and post access)

Financial Crime Risk Officer

Sanctions in Action (including read access to regulatory news feed)

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When one looks at investigations into money laundering in Australia, there is a factor that crops up over and over and over again. The money came from, or has a connection to, Malaysia. And it's not the connection the rest of the world expects.

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