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aml/cft

As actual and threatened famine spreads across Africa, aid schemes are struggling to get funding for relief. But that's only a part of the story. The real - and hidden problem - is where the famines are. That's a major risk for governments, aid agencies, charities and individual donors. Worse, the crisis is going to amplify existing problems.

New legislation introduced into New Zealand's parliament yesterday will plug some surprising holes in the country's counter-money laundering laws. But it's important to recognise that New Zealand has some special problems that, in essence, mean that this developed economy should be measured against developing economies when regulatory, etc. rules are considered, says Nigel Morris-Cotterill. The Bill contains one major foul-up, he says.

The European Union's Fourth Money Laundering Directive recognises the financial sector regulatory framework created in response to the global financial crisis. The three headline bodies are required to work jointly in a number of areas and, in relation to money laundering and terrorist financing, to produce a "Joint Opinion" every two years. Yesterday, it released the first. Here is our first look and, starting only four lines into the Executive Summary, there are important points to consider.

As off-site storage of hard copies becomes more common - as does outsourcing of document destruction - the question of liability for loss and / or security breaches becomes ever more important. A US insurance company has designed a policy specifically for that industry.