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fraud

When Americans discovered "day trading" they thought they were onto something new.

They weren't.

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CoNet Section: 

This spam-scam is remarkable. It's as if the sender thinks that by throwing everything at the wall, something will stick. But for the even slightly alert, it fails before the target even opens it.

FCRO Subsection: 

As governments around the world ponder the possibility of making banks liable for losses suffered by customers who are the victims of e.g. phishing scams, there are companies that actively assist the fraudsters to get away with it. Let's start at the top: Google.

Those with long memories will remember the well-worn name of Andre Coker. It's been used in a variety of spam-scams but, at least insofar as it's reached us, been unused for some time. But it's back and Andre is a woman now.

It's been modified from the advance fee fraud e-mails that we are used to and someone has been to writing lessons.

It starts with an unusual approach, then moves into the same technique as we've seen from this name dozens of times over many years.

Oh, and he uses UN.ORG as the "from" address. Cheeky.

FCRO Subsection: 

This spam-scam is fascinating: it looks like an old telex message. Very clever.

But it's still an obvious fraud when you read it.

BIScom Subsection: 

This morning, a spam-scam arrived claiming that a subscription had been renewed.

Then a few minutes later, we came across a news article that had something in common.

Is it pure coincidence?

FCRO Subsection: 

The Journal of Clinical Investigation is a genuine scientific journal.

However, fraudsters have used its name to attract attention to a rogue website.

World Remit (www.worldremit.com) says that it has learned that there are at least two fake websites.

CoNet Section: 

The Carbolic Smoke Ball case gave carte blanch for businesses to lie so long as they didn't go too far.

But that related to the efficacy of their products.

Here's an extraordinarily blatant lie that is so common that it's a surprise that it's not stamped on as a matter of policy.

FCRO Subsection: 

More than 100 people put more than USD10 million dollars into, amongst other things, a fake food business. That's a lot of money on average so we can assume these were not stupid people. George S. Blankenbaker Jr., 56 found a honey hole and worked it hard. His reward is jail.

That's not the end of the story...

In a criminal prosecution brought by the Australian Securities and Investment Commission, ASIC, the financial regulator, two out of five criminal charges brought against an alleged fraudster were dropped because the witnesses in those cases became "unavailable." The charges related to conducting an unauthorised financial services business and to soliciting moneys which were used improperly.

Nevertheless, the accused has pleaded guilty to the remaining three charges at the door of the court before his trial commenced yesterday.

It's a long and convoluted story across years and jurisdictions as well as various enforcement agencies.

From an SEC press notice, 13th July 2021 (slightly edited)

"The Securities and Exchange Commission today announced [proceedings] against special purpose acquisition corporation Stable Road Acquisition Company, its sponsor SRC-NI, its CEO Brian Kabot, the SPAC’s proposed merger target Momentus Inc., and Momentus’ founder and former CEO Mikhail Kokorich [alleging] misleading claims about Momentus’ technology and about national security risks associated with Kokorich. "

BIScom Subsection: 

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