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fraud

Is this how malware gets onto your mobile?

One of our rarely used e-mail addresses has been miraculously spam-free. Literally, no spam at all. Until about two weeks ago. Then something weird started to happen. And there's a pattern. Given the recent attacks on mobiles via WhatsApp, one has to ask: is this recent format spam directed at mobile users? Nigel Morris-Cotterill adopts a risk-averse approach while encouraging risk awareness.

CoNet Section: 

The Dubai Financial Services Authority (DFSA) has issued a warning about a fraudulent website.

BIScom Subsection: 

This follow up to the article about a crypto-asset trading fraud being promoted on LinkedIn shows the persistence of the fraudsters.

(updates as to telephone numbers and emails will be added to this article from time to time)

UPDATE 200191120: disturbing find: a paid-for advert on LinkedIn which is therefore profiting from this fraud.

FCRO Subsection: 

We all know that getting any kind of new project off the ground is a complex, stressful and potentially ruinous venture. So, while there are those that spend their own capital, sweat equity, there are those that seek funding in the forms of loans or investment. So what happened when two New Jersey men decided to bootstrap their proposed development of a leisure complex with bunker-like, "doomsday", apartments designed to withstand every thing from biological threats to a nuclear winter?

FCRO Subsection: 

This might just be the e-mail that launches a million problems, or more. It is incredibly simple and extremely sneaky. And it passes some anti-spam filters.

FCRO Subsection: 

There's more than USD2,000 million in moneys clawed back from fraudulent deals.

Oh, wait. It's a spam-scam. And it wants you to send your identification documents "via" a telephone number. Genius.

FCRO Subsection: 

It all looks so viable: Henry Golding, the star of the fantastically successful film "Crazy Rich Asians", in an interview with the very credible Singapore newspaper The Straits Times, says he's making shed loads of money in an automated trading scheme endorsed by, amongst others, Bill Gates. And it's floated around LinkedIn for a while. We took a look.

FCRO Subsection: 

Case Summary: 

A man has been jailed for almost six years more than six years after a persistent fraud targeted home owners who were at risk of repossession.

Type of conduct: 
Consumer fraud

Fraud committed against Chinese in Australia has been a problem for a while as criminals use a variety of tactics. It is known, for example, that young foreign Mandarin speakers are recruited abroad to visit Australia for short periods, affecting tourism status, where they follow a script to commit fraud or extortion in a way similar to the boiler-room scams often run by Europeans in South East Asia. This year is is already far worse than the whole of last year.

FCRO Subsection: 

Case Summary: 

When a bank introduced a scheme under which persons could receive commissions for introducing potential mortgage borrowers who went on to take out a loan, a bank manager saw the opportunity for secret profits.

Type of conduct: 
Bank fraud

It's remarkably easy to spoof telephone numbers i.e. to make any number one chooses to show up in the caller ID of the recipient's phone. So if a criminal is going to do that, why not choose someone special?

CoNet Section: 

Perhaps in the Arab world the usual hook for spam-scammers of a few hundred thousand dollars, or even a couple of million, is small change. So this fraud is offering me more than 25 million (undefined) dollars in a most unusual manner. But then it turns to a bog standard, old fashioned, Nigerian (advance fee fraud) Scam.

BIScom Subsection: 

Spoofing email addresses (that is making it look like an e-mail comes from somewhere other than its actual sender) is a remarkably easy trick and it's heavily relied on by spammers. However, this particular spam goes further, aping the tactics used by those who send e-mails that appear to come from banks. Be warned....

Criminals and others who act against the interests of society at large are almost always ahead of financial crime and other risk managers when it comes to the the planning and execution of activity. Criminal and anti-social activity are magnified in relation to the effect on economies, even ultimately being an accelerant in the fires that led to the global financial crisis that only the most naive or self-centred deny is over. The fascinating thing is this: while they don't know it, the seeds of major, even pandemic, crime are easily visible. You just need to know where to look.

Free for seven days.

This fraudster pretends to be a partner with a London law firm called "Richardson Lawyer Chamber" - without realising that the name contains a grammatical error that raises suspicion within the first few lines. And then there's his name: "David T Duddias" - a format very rarely used in the UK. Finally, the mail is sent from a mail address which may or may not be real and may or may not be spoofed but it's in Japan which raises its own questions and his return address is with that current favourite of fraudsters, Outlook.com. As if that's not bad enough, the spam-scam is plain: he wants to commit a fraud against someone else and he wants your help to launder the proceeds. Obviously, what he really wants is to defraud you. Read the full e-mail below.

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