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fraud

Case Summary: 

A financial adviser recommended a form of investment to clients but instead of using the money in accordance with the agreed plan he used the money for his own purposes and created fictitious records to show purported performance of their investments. He has been sentenced to ten years' jail. Asset freezing orders against the defendant have preserved sufficient to cover all or most of the losses.

Type of conduct: 
Fiduciary fraud

The return, with increasing frequency, of internet domain name fraud, is usually at least accompanied by a form of what the fraudster hopes is a sufficient disclaimer to prevent prosecution. The latest iteration omits even that and resorts to blatant threats. Also, it seems that the criminals have obtained access to the domain sevenresortsnet.com to send mail and to present a landing page for those who click to respond to the demand.

CoNet Section: 

The flood of sextortion e-mails demanding payment in bitcoin continues. However, while the body of the mails is increasingly standardised, the anti-avoidance methods used by the criminals is mutating, analysis of reports at GlobalKYC.com indicates.

CoNet Section: 

Fraud is cyclical. Historically, frauds would lie dormant for, perhaps, five years then come back. But the cycle has become much shorter, often only two or three months. Some frauds have become perpetual, aided by e-mail that hits so many prospective targets at such a low marginal cost. Others have a few days in the light before disappearing into relative darkness for a matter of weeks, perhaps because the targets are sorted by e.g. alphabetical order, into batches. One such is fraud relating to domain names. They take several forms but the same basic structure. The fraudster hints that, if you don't pay up, your domain name will stop working. Here's the anatomy of one such fraudulent mail that has reached us multiple times in the past several days.

CoNet Section: 

It's not rocket science. Ever since (I think) 1998 when the BBC's lawyers blocked an explanation I gave to BBC TV on how the nature of HTML facilitates on-line fraud (the feared that it would increase the number of criminals using it) criminals have, indeed, used certain features of HTML to hide what they are up to and ordinary people have lost many millions of dollars and have suffered innumerable attacks on their computers simply because of one, very simple, trick, writes Nigel Morris-Cotterill

CoNet Section: 

It is often said (by our boss, Nigel Morris-Cotterill) that those who succumb to Nigerian (419) frauds are either greedy or stupid. And that old scams never die, they just hibernate for a while and that spam-scammers often time their contact to hit while people are in a sanguine or relaxed state of mind. This spam-scam, he says, proves all of that.

Notice issued by FINRA, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority relating to pump and dump and other frauds.

Beware of Stock Fraud in the Wake of Hurricane Florence

It may not be possible to predict when the next natural disaster will take place. What you can count on is that when it happens, scammers will try to take advantage of the situation. The tips below will help you protect yourself at any time.

And, we're back. Once more, the authorities in the USA are reminding people that fraudsters use natural disasters as the hook for their activities.

Case Summary: 

The owner of an interior design company denied the right of the US government to charge income tax on his earnings. So he set about an elaborate scheme to evade taxes. He's been convicted and is due to be sentenced in November 2018. His schemes were both daring and extensive but the tax evaded over that period was a relatively small amount.

Type of conduct: 
Tax fraud / evasion

A doctor prescribed meds his patients didn't need, claimed payment and spent the proceeds. Now he's serving a 12 year jail sentence for, amongst other things, laundering the proceeds of his own offence.

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