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fraud

Customer Response Centres (CRCs) are the point of contact for every disgruntled customer. They are the public face of the enterprise. They are also often far (in both management and geography) removed from the company that the customer thinks he is dealing with. Performance is measured and the amount paid to the CRC operator depends on achieving defined Key Performance Indicators, or KPI. However, some CRCs are producing false KPIs which, because they are what payment depends upon, are in fact false accounting and fraud. Here's how it's happening.

Editorial Staff
Publication: 

How many tags can we add to this article? LexTech (as in legal technology)?, LegalTech? FinTech, contracting? Cloudflare? DNS Laundering? ICO? Regulation? If nothing else, the story is a warning to regulators to stop and think: are they really doing it right or just being swept along on a wave of other people's self-interest and enthusiasm?

Confido described itself as "using smart contracts with a unique shipment tracking feature." The idea was that it would become a trusted third party (remember that term from the early days of internet payments? It's still useful) as, in effect, an escrow holder. In fact, what the company was offering was far more prosaic:

Nigel Morris-Cotterill
BIScom Subsection: 

The following e-mail addresses are associated with potential phishing or drive-by malware attacks this morning:

davidibe718@gmail.com
J.Ryan@hud.ac.uk

Editorial Staff
Publication: 

Case Summary: 

Two members of staff at a driving and vehicle licensing office has have pleaded guilty to taking bribes to issue commercial driving licences to persons who had not passed the relevant driving tests. Although little is made of this part of the case, it is noticeable that it involved lawful access to computer systems for illegal purposes.

World Money Laundering Report

A man who, through a corporate entity, operated off-street parking schemes on premises owned by a fund to raise money for former servicemen has been arrested after an investigation discovered that he, allegedly, failed to account to the fund for as much as USD11 million over a period of years.

We've received an e-mail from a company with a .ae domain name. It offers us a spectacular opportunity to become a "Certified Fraud Examiner."

There's just one problem: once we started to read the e-mail it was clear that the headline was not true

Following on from the warning on Sunday (see here) Dubai Financial Services Authority has issued a notice relating to a second fraud involving false documents relating to DFSA.

The Dubai Financial Services Authority (DFSA) alerts the financial services community and members of the public about a fraudulent scheme in which the DFSA has been impersonated.

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