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fraud

Dogs, palm trees, a rather individual way of life in the tropics - John McAfee - the chap who, effectively, created the software anti-virus industry - has long been a thorn in the side of the US authorities but exactly why he gets so much attention when so many other slide by is a mystery. Yes, there was something about a gun but now he's in trouble for making comments on Twitter. They say he "fraudulently touted" Initial Coin Offerings. Er.. isn't that tautology?

One of the most persistent forms of fraud, now well over 100 years old, is directory fraud. In a recent iteration, there is at least something a little different.

CoNet Section: 

Should financial institutions consider the character of customers as a risk factor? A recent case in Australia suggests that it might be wise to do so.

FCRO Subsection: 

This is so amateur that it's worth our publishing it. The "reply to" address is at a free and anonymous mail account in Hungary: georgievakristalina01@vipmail.hu . But there is something interesting.

FCRO Subsection: 

For the background to this story, see here: https://www.pleasebeinformed.com/publications/Financial_Crime_Risk_Officers/persistence_cryptotrading_fraudsters and here: https://www.pleasebeinformed.com/publications/Financial_Crime_Risk_Officers/get_rich_quick_scheme_being_pumped_linkedin

Now the fraudsters, or their associates, are back. And this time they have new telephone numbers.

FCRO Subsection: 

You know that thing about airport security, where no one gets on a flight if they aren't who they say they are? And you know that the USA is so obsessed with airport security under its "war on terror" thing that all flights are locked down tighter than a tight thing?

It's not true and this document fraud shows how lax security really is in the US aviation industry. Remember this the next time some one questions a detail on your ticket at check-in. It's the old thing - the bigger the lie, the less people are likely to spot it.

FCRO Subsection: 

That's it. We've had enough. Until internet domain name registrars start to adopt responsible practices over who they sell domains to, especially the plethora of top level domains that criminals habitually use for the nefarious activities, it's time to block them entirely.

CoNet Section: 

Fraudsters are like fishermen: they dangle a juicy titbit and expect you to snap it up and get hooked.

But often it's not actually a worm, it's fake meat, a plant-based concoction that has artificially induced flavours and aromas. It misrepresents itself by appearance.

That's what this scam is all about and only the names have been changed because J.K. Rowling is back in the news.

FCRO Subsection: 

A spam appearing using the name of Santander links to a fake website.

BIScom Subsection: 

The conviction of a solicitor and his practice manager on fraud charges is bad enough.

But what's worse is that the practice manager seems to have been able to get into positions of trust despite a demonstrably untrustworthy history.

FCRO Subsection: 

They say, at the end "this is not invoice." But by the time you get that far, you've already been sucked in.

CoNet Section: 

A business using, almost inevitably, an e-mail address at one of the large US based anonymous e-mail services (in this case harry.vangundy@msn.com ) claims to be operating out of Luxumbourg. In fact, the form advertises arguably illegal services and promotes it by wilfully committing unlawful access to websites.

CoNet Section: 

As spam-filters become more alert to spam-scams, many criminals have moved on from selling overpriced, poor quality or non-existent facemasks and the like.

Following the trend set by UK TV advertising where on-line gambling has reached near-epidemic proportions, there is an increased rash of gambling spams. But the most significant trend is to focus on the lifestyle changes faced by millions as they sit at home wondering what to do next.

FCRO Subsection: 

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