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fraud

It is often said (by our boss, Nigel Morris-Cotterill) that those who succumb to Nigerian (419) frauds are either greedy or stupid. And that old scams never die, they just hibernate for a while and that spam-scammers often time their contact to hit while people are in a sanguine or relaxed state of mind. This spam-scam, he says, proves all of that.

It's now clear: posting message on social media such as twitter, facebook and instagram is regarded by the USA's Securities and Exchange Commission in the same light as any other statement and the consequences for false or misleading information are the same as any other means of disseminating such information. Elon Musk, hardly a shrinking violet when it comes to grabbing headlines for his various ventures, is the defendant in a civil action brought by the SEC: what happens here will define both how corporations use social media and whether others who have posted material they should not have done will be brought to book.

BIScom Subsection: 

ASIC has taken action to stop several proposed initial coin offerings or token-generation events (together, "ICO"s), targeting retail investors.

Notice issued by FINRA, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority relating to pump and dump and other frauds.

Beware of Stock Fraud in the Wake of Hurricane Florence

It may not be possible to predict when the next natural disaster will take place. What you can count on is that when it happens, scammers will try to take advantage of the situation. The tips below will help you protect yourself at any time.

It takes something of a cheek to solicit investment in a fraudulent scheme and to publish a website with comments falsely attributed to the Chairman of the Monetary Authority of Singapore who also happens to be the country's deputy prime minister. But as MAS has warned, that's exactly what someone is doing...

And, we're back. Once more, the authorities in the USA are reminding people that fraudsters use natural disasters as the hook for their activities.

A doctor prescribed meds his patients didn't need, claimed payment and spent the proceeds. Now he's serving a 12 year jail sentence for, amongst other things, laundering the proceeds of his own offence.

Case Summary: 

The owner of an interior design company denied the right of the US government to charge income tax on his earnings. So he set about an elaborate scheme to evade taxes. He's been convicted and is due to be sentenced in November 2018. His schemes were both daring and extensive but the tax evaded over that period was a relatively small amount.

Type of conduct: 
Tax fraud / evasion

Case Summary: 

In August 2018, two men were convicted of fraudulent dealings in the assets of a company with the intent to transfer them to a new company so as to continue in business after the old company went into liquidation.

Type of conduct: 
Insolvency offences

The Hong Kong Monetary Authority (HKMA) has issued warnings relating to fake websites and/or phishing attacks on customers of three banks: China Citic, OCBC Wing Hang and Bank of China.

FCRO Subsection: 

Case Summary: 

A man has been convicted of money laundering after he and two others sold a house without the knowledge of its owner.

Type of conduct: 
Money Laundering

Case Summary: 

A group of 14 hospitals in California and its founder have avoided conviction for a fraud that took place over an eight year period. A whistleblower made a report and will receive more than USD17 million as a reward.

Type of conduct: 
Healthcare / Medicare fraud

While there is global fascination with the case against Malaysia's former prime minister Najib Razak, who has been charged with offences that, at present, do not include money laundering, the world is seeing an unprecedented range of cases brought against politicians and those close to them. Has the tide turned and are politicians, previously considered largely untouchable, now legitimate targets?

The news that judges, in London, have been charged with fraud is just part of a much larger problem. Alongside them are solicitors. The Metropolitan Police have been investigating what they describe as a "complex fraud team investigation." The case started after a court clerk reported suspicions of suspicious claims for state-funded payments under the Legal Aid Scheme. However, legal aid fraud has been a long-running problem in the legal system in England and Wales with criminal and immigration practitioners being most commonly reported.

Legal professional privilege used to be simple: if a document or thing came to the attention of a lawyer in the course of, or in during preparation for, litigation it was privileged. That was it. Simple, clear and everyone knew where they stood. Then some twit decided to invent "legal advice privilege" which tends to the view that anything said between a lawyer and his client is privileged. Then no one knew where they stood because, in England and Wales and therefore in other jurisdictions following that, behind all of this lay two fundamental principles: a solicitor is an officer of the Court and must not mislead the Court and legal professional privilege breaks when a client attempts to involve the solicitor in the commission of a crime. Advocates of legal advice privilege were not supportive of that.

CoNet Section: 

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