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fraud

bolor@euroexchangesecurities.co.uk
*Swift Outward Transaction Report*

FCRO Subsection: 

A scam-spam has been received from the fake internet domain WESTEMUNION.COM

(see update, below)

BIScom Subsection: 

It's a stupid name: TSB is an acronym for Trustees Savings Bank and then some idiot, years ago, decided to add "Bank" to the acronym, in a move that rivals the equally stupid "ATM machine." But that's not the reason this heavy-duty spam-scam mailout is an obvious fraud. Warning: the content is highly plausible and the mail constructed to avoid even aggressive anti-spam filters.

BIScom Subsection: 

Lessons in taking screenshots. After I wrote about Skype's pricing scheme, I logged onto Skype to see a message saying that my transaction remained outstanding. I clicked on it and was surprised: it had been adjusted to show that I should pay GBP10, not GBP12. OK, I thought, click to buy. How I wish I'd been realistic (some may say sceptical) and taken a screen shot. Previous story: Credit card companies should beware of payments to Skype.

FCRO Subsection: 

Ben Jayaweera, of Upper Mt Gravatt, has today appeared in the Brisbane Magistrates' Court charged with six counts of fraud involving approximately AUD5.9 million.

FCRO Subsection: 

IP address: 37.46.124.111
@companieshouse-gov.uk (fake domain.
(free content)

FCRO Subsection: 

This is more than a little bit scary. A criminal, exactly what kind isn't clear, has been reading the major Australian employment website Seek.com.au - and then he (it's almost always a "he") is sending invitations to become involved in money laundering or, possibly, to be a victim of a long-established scheme to defraud his victims. The scam letter is a collection of so many currently trendy phrases that it might be convincing - especially to someone who is in awe of cryptocurrencies, blockchain (as they call it) and so many other trigger words. Oh, and there's an interesting twist to the old version of this crime.

FCRO Subsection: 

The risks to financial institutions, lawyers and accountants presented by their venture capital clients has long been recognised. But what of the risks that venture capital providers face as a result of their investments? WMLR identified a range of risks for both angel investors and those with a full VC involvement.

It's registration spam-scam time again. This one, originating from a spurious domain, (.pw domains are much loved by fraudsters and other internet criminals and this one is no exception) is one of the most bizarre e-mails ever and is therefore likely to succeed.

CoNet Section: 

An indictment alleges accused "tricked homeowners into signing fraudulent deeds on their properties and then allegedly used the fraudulent deeds to extort money from homeowners, charge homeowners illegal fees to delay foreclosure and eviction actions and to steal some homes outright."

BIScom Subsection: 

Case Summary: 

A woman from Florida, USA, who was convicted of fraudulently obtaining more than USD100,000 in benefits from her employer has been ordered to repay the amount but not sent to jail.

Type of conduct: 
Benefits fraud

In the trials (there were two) of Peter Hall, et al, for fraud, a company, TAD Services Limited was named.

There's a interesting back-story - and Google makes a guest appearance as a company that was paid to participate in the scam.

CoNet Section: 

Case Summary: 

Six people were convicted and sentenced to jail terms following their convictions for fraud. They set up websites that were close copies of websites of various governments, promising to perform various services for which they had no legal authority or ability to perform.

Type of conduct: 
Computer crime

There's a lot of dispute over exactly what constitutes "spam" with legislation influenced by the advertising and marketing industry often defining the term far more narrowly than the public at large. Whether it's legally spam or not, one thing happens far more than it should in unsolicited advertising. That thing is where the e-mail is dishonest in some respect ranging from fake senders through misleading content to out and out lies. The basic rule for recipients is simple: if a mail fails a simple test - "is it true?" - the only safe option is to bin it and block the sender.

CoNet Section: 

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