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Indycar

I'm highly critical of American style oval racing. It's far too orchestrated by "IndyCar" or "Nascar" and it's boring unless there's a crash (and who wants to wish for crashes that cause injury or death?). After all, who wants to sit through 185 laps only for a crash to force the "full course yellow" or, even, "safety car" that sets up the cars for the only bit that really matters: the last ten laps or so to the finish. I've watched it, on and off, for several decades and it's almost always Dullsville personified. Until this year's Indy 500. Oh, how I wish they could all be like this.

CoNet Section: 

I've had the chance to watch an Indycar race on TV, something that, because of various rights fights, has been denied me for several years. There's good close racing but there's a lot wrong both with the rules and the way the sport is presented. What should have been edge of the seat stuff turned into a festival of yawns and a great deal of frustration. And then there's the cars.

CoNet Section: 

We all know motor racing is dangerous, be it F1, MotoGP, Indycar, Aussie V8s or any of a host of lesser series. But safety developments have been such that most drivers and riders walk away from the most devastating crashes. Here are some that have been spared serious injury, never mind death, by those improvements, many of which began with the work of Prof Sid Watkins, Ayrton Senna and Sir Jackie Stewart.

 


 

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