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Ireland

The UK recently banned flights from the UAE because of fears over growing corona virus risks. It also added Turkey and Qatar to its red list. Ireland is a special case and there is free movement between the UK and Ireland.

Trying to fly to the UK from the Far East is difficult. At the moment, many flights are via the Middle East or Turkey. Some are via Singapore which is on the UK's "Green list."

But one middle east airline has found a way to circumvent the UK's ban on flights from there - and to facilitate dishonest passengers who want to avoid spending GBP2,000 on quarantine and testing and, of course, risk spreading CoVid-19 into the UK's population.

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Socialists in the USA and elsewhere will be getting ready to slash their wrists and there will be millions of bits and bytes spent in haranguing US President Donald Trump for the corporate tax strategy he revealed yesterday. But wait: he's done what everyone should do - he's followed the money and found a way to bring it back on-shore and, therefore, subject to US tax and to be available for domestic investment. Someone, somewhere, has been thinking long and hard and Trump has been listening to those that understand that economics is not about money, it's about people. The plan is not disruptive, it's seismic.

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Following on from Part 1 of our analysis of Theresa May's Brexit speech last week, here are the highlights from and comments on the next part of her plan. And how the plan does not reflect the wishes of the people as recorded in the Referendum.

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The OECD Working Group on Bribery says that Ireland has failed to act on the Working Group's "recommendation" to make certain that the counter-money laundering law (Criminal Justice (Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing) Act 2010) applies to Irish companies that launder the proceeds of bribing foreign officials, even if there is no law relating to bribery in the official's country. The OECD might have misread Ireland's laws.

Economists are lining up to say that the Republic of Ireland's astonishing 26% growth in GDP has no meaning, in the great scheme of things. They are wrong and this is why: Ireland attracts high-value added businesses because of its commitment to low income and corporate taxes that most of the EU, the USA and Australia want it to change.

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