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Money Laundering

AUSTRAC statement

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16 January 2018 (updated 18 January)

Editorial Staff
BIScom Subsection: 

India's Enforcement Directorate (ED) is involved in a rapidly increasing number of cases where money laundering is alleged and it is not afraid to go after high-profile, well connected, targets. But the latest case to gain publicity is even more sensitive than others. And the ED is finding itself the target of unwelcome attacks by some of India's most powerful people.

US President Trump has been looking for a win: for almost a year, the Senate has frustrated his legislative ambitions. His Bill to make fundamental changes to the USA's income and company tax structure was expected to be the next big failure. Instead, it has sailed through both Houses, but its final signing into law will be delayed due to "a procedural issue," although the result of that is a formality in favour of it being passed. Once in place, it will mean the biggest revision of the US Tax Code for more than 30 years. Some of the changes mean that MLROs etc. overseas will need to revise their policies.

The judgment in the AUSTRAC -v-Tabcorp civil case is a landmark: it's the first civil case that AUSTRAC has brought to a conclusion in court. But the judgment is only the latest step in a long running investigation and series of regulatory actions against the ASX-listed gambling giant.

A man who, through a corporate entity, operated off-street parking schemes on premises owned by a fund to raise money for former servicemen has been arrested after an investigation discovered that he, allegedly, failed to account to the fund for as much as USD11 million over a period of years.

The final (of three) part of World Money Laundering Report's analysis of the Manafort and Gates case and its implications for the financial services and other regulated industries.

Here, in this three part article, World Money Laundering Report examines the charges, the background and the impact on financial services and other regulated businesses.

Continuing our analysis of how Australia's Proceeds of Crime Act provides a mechanism for successful money laundering.

See Part I here

Late-stage money laundering is after the proceeds of criminal conduct have already been through a series of transactions to hide, move and even invest them. As the proceeds move further away from the original source, their origin is obscured but they are still not safe. Late-stage laundering usually involves using financial institutions or jurisdictions that are known to have good systems in place and therefore the next move is with the benefit of their reputation. Australia, on the other hand, provides - enshrined in its law - a safe haven that provides positive encouragement to launderers to place late-stage laundering there.

Part II here

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