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scam

2 October 2020
Press release: Verbatim
RE: Beware of ‘Quick-and-Easy’ Money-Making Ventures

The Cayman Islands Monetary Authority(“CIMA”) cautions the public about entering into investment ventures that promote ‘quick-and-easy’ money, as they can easily become subjects of fraudulent schemes that can result insubstantial financial loss.

One of the most persistent forms of fraud, now well over 100 years old, is directory fraud. In a recent iteration, there is at least something a little different.

CoNet Section: 

Good grief. This arrived today. It's a straight copy, errors included but with the links redacted. And if there really is someone called "Blythe Masters," if I were you I'd sue your parents for giving you such a stupid name.

CoNet Section: 

That's it. We've had enough. Until internet domain name registrars start to adopt responsible practices over who they sell domains to, especially the plethora of top level domains that criminals habitually use for the nefarious activities, it's time to block them entirely.

CoNet Section: 

A spam appearing using the name of Santander links to a fake website.

BIScom Subsection: 

This morning's crop of overnight spam that made it through the preliminary filters arrived via a contact form relating to this very site. Ordinarily, form spams are either destroyed or reported on, partly because, even using bots, the scams that get through the anti-spam systems on the forms are a cut above the junk that comes in by mail and, often, present new - or at least new to us - threats. This one is carefully crafted, almost as if it's been revised several times to get it right. And, if it were to hit its intended target - investment businesses - it would at least cause a costly waste of time. But only time because, good as it is, it suffers from a significant flaw.

BIScom Subsection: 

There's a question mark over the sense of allowing tv advertising and - worse - actual gambling on TV. In the UK, it all goes back to Labour's Gordon Brown who decided that the UK's economy would be served by a massive relaxation of the laws on gambling, especially casinos. Suddenly, gambling was cool - after all "Cool Britannia" was Noo Labour's central policy, chummy first names and all.

The end result was an explosion of gambling of many kinds. And that meant competition in an expanding market. Late night, drunk or sexually frustrated TV watchers were offered a choice - soft (sometimes not so soft) porn, often masquerading as documentaries - and games in which telephone customers bet on televised casino games - or phoned a woman who appeared on their screen, her g-string being her...

"We discovered that our data source was modified by an unauthorized agent" says the e-mail that purports to be from LinkedIn. But it isn't. And there's even a little hint at the end to prove it.

IMPORTANT UPDATE

CoNet Section: 

It's incredible how many spammers lie, even those who fill in a webform and have to pass bot-resistant tools to submit it. This one makes an amazing lie: that he found our own Group company details on Facebook. Well, we don't have any Facebook page so that's not true. It's for that old figment of the imagination, SEO services, including on Instagram which, also, we don't use. Even the completion of the formal parts of the form show dishonestly and a willingness to mislead. Not bright at all.

CoNet Section: 

If it's got lies in it, it's got to be a fraud. And this one is stupid even by the low standards we often see.

CoNet Section: 

We can barely contain the laughter. This scam e-mail is the same old same old but unlike so many, it's beautifully written. But what's not funny is that Microsoft and Google continue to facilitate fraudulent conduct.

FCRO Subsection: 

The email below has come to our attention today. using a landing page at mybluemix[dot]com and a (perhaps spoofed) address at the domain masew.ml, the scam has characteristics that instantly give it away to the alert but will trap the unwary.

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