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scam

The advance fee, or 419, scam industry is always looking for new opportunities and the fraudsters like to use genuine background as the reason they make contact with potential victims. A case in the High Court of England and Wales has created the conditions that are ideal for fraudsters as a hook.

The return, with increasing frequency, of internet domain name fraud, is usually at least accompanied by a form of what the fraudster hopes is a sufficient disclaimer to prevent prosecution. The latest iteration omits even that and resorts to blatant threats. Also, it seems that the criminals have obtained access to the domain sevenresortsnet.com to send mail and to present a landing page for those who click to respond to the demand.

CoNet Section: 

When Australia took action against an internet scammer for sending out notices relating to domains (see here) the effect on those committing similar frauds was... zero.

CoNet Section: 

E-mail inboxes have long been plagued with dubious offers to renew domain names or to buy similar names to prevent cybersquatters taking control of them or even for entries into some kind of directory. It's a nuisance but, so far, the perpetrators of the actions have avoided prosecution by a range of sneaky tactics. Australia's Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has obtained orders (not convictions) against two companies and a disqualification order against their principle officer.

CoNet Section: 

Sending server: webmail.123-reg.co.uk
Request for External Wire transfer

CoNet Section: 

We can do no more than post the content of three spams that arrived in five minutes and urge readers to block the domain trixologyvapors.com to prevent this hyperactive spammer's material reaching staff.

CoNet Section: 

This weekend has been an interesting weekend for spam, not the least of which is because such a large amount got through our first line filters: far more than usual. But they were all stopped at the second line of defence and as we trawled through the blocked messages, we came across several that were worthy of comment. One is that old chestnut, the United Nations scam; another is the latest example from a spam-house that now allows us to identify their server farm and it is particularly interesting because it appears to promote a scheme that fell under the bus when the British tax authorities began action in relation to that scheme. And then there's the special mention of the persistent finditeasy.info which is just the most blatant spam-scam that it's hard to understand how they think it will pass any filter. And there's more....

CoNet Section: 

We've had enough of spam from a group of servers that is being a serious nuisance. And they all have one thing in common: they are investment related, in one form or another.

Working on the assumption that, if all victims adopt this policy spammers can be at least a little frustrated, this is what we have written to the company hosting the servers because, by reducing the business the ISP can do, there may be some pressure to be brought to bear on them to prevent their servers being used for spam.

CoNet Section: 

A carefully addressed but badly worded e-mail spam has arrived and it's got the potential to suck in many users across organisations.

CoNet Section: 

Walking along a Phuket beachfront, "John," in his mid thirties and from England's North West, cut a solitary figure, hunched, the high-visibility of someone trying to keep a low profile. As he posed for a selfie with an unusually insipid sunrise at his back, he gave of the air of the careworn. "Can I get a boat from here to Malaysia?" he asked. As his story unfolded, it raised as many questions as it gave answers.

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