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spam

The email is doomed to be subject to review because the idiot sender has spoofed the recipient's address and used it as the sender's address. But, otherwise, for the unwary, in the period leading up to critical gift delivery period, the scam has a high chance of success.

Editorial Staff
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Thanks to all the scammers who make is sooooo easy to send their mails to the bin unread.

But we've been digging around in the spam-trap because sometimes we find things that make us smile.

Here's this week's SPAM AWARDS

A new form of spam-scam has come to our attention. We understand that this has not been widely seen before. Its nature is that it is likely that many receiving the email will click on links.

Editorial Staff
Publication: 

A purported mailing list broker is marketing a list of users of money laundering, etc. risk management software. There are clear security implications for officers in sensitive functions, if the list is what it claims to be and money laundering risk officers, etc. should therefore be aware that information relating to them and their employers and suppliers is being indiscriminately touted for sale.

On several occasions recently, our filters have picked up e-mail from a company promoting itself as "5mins" and, as is common, offering directory services. But this one is a little different. No matter what, the target is in a lose-lose situation, which is odd because on so many levels, the mail appears to be acting both properly and legally. But there is just enough that isn't right to raise suspicions - and the UK's Information Commissioner's Office, which is responsible for the implementation of the new GPDR regime and is already having a hard time handling the scaremongering that's almost as bad as Y2K.

Editorial Staff
Publication: 

We love, really love, the most ludicrous spam-scams we can find and this one is an absolute classic of its type.

Editorial Staff
BIScom Subsection: 

A form of scam spam has come to our notice this morning. It is unusually convincing and clever.

It purports to come from Scotia Bank's secure e-mail service but, obviously, it does not.

Details below.

Editorial Staff
Publication: 

I don't have a Facebook account, or at least I wouldn't have one if Facebook didn't adopt a fascist approach to me and my data and refuse to let me close the one I stupidly opened several years ago.

But they won't leave me alone, says Nigel Morris-Cotterill

Nigel Morris-Co...
Publication: 

There's a whole industry, across the world, that charges fees for doing things you can easily do for free and which give you the impression, whilst not actually saying so, that you need their services to obtain your rights. One is the domain name registration scam, that appears in several variants.

Here's today's.

Editorial Staff
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