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spam

A purported mailing list broker is marketing a list of users of money laundering, etc. risk management software. There are clear security implications for officers in sensitive functions, if the list is what it claims to be and money laundering risk officers, etc. should therefore be aware that information relating to them and their employers and suppliers is being indiscriminately touted for sale.

On several occasions recently, our filters have picked up e-mail from a company promoting itself as "5mins" and, as is common, offering directory services. But this one is a little different. No matter what, the target is in a lose-lose situation, which is odd because on so many levels, the mail appears to be acting both properly and legally. But there is just enough that isn't right to raise suspicions - and the UK's Information Commissioner's Office, which is responsible for the implementation of the new GPDR regime and is already having a hard time handling the scaremongering that's almost as bad as Y2K.

Editorial Staff
Publication: 

We love, really love, the most ludicrous spam-scams we can find and this one is an absolute classic of its type.

Editorial Staff
BIScom Subsection: 

A form of scam spam has come to our notice this morning. It is unusually convincing and clever.

It purports to come from Scotia Bank's secure e-mail service but, obviously, it does not.

Details below.

Editorial Staff
Publication: 

I don't have a Facebook account, or at least I wouldn't have one if Facebook didn't adopt a fascist approach to me and my data and refuse to let me close the one I stupidly opened several years ago.

But they won't leave me alone, says Nigel Morris-Cotterill

Nigel Morris-Co...
Publication: 

There's a whole industry, across the world, that charges fees for doing things you can easily do for free and which give you the impression, whilst not actually saying so, that you need their services to obtain your rights. One is the domain name registration scam, that appears in several variants.

Here's today's.

Editorial Staff
Publication: 

In recent weeks, we've seen a significant number of spam-scams from a domain that is remarkably similar to an official UK government domain, showing that registrars and hosts are failing to identify obviously fraudulent customers. The fraudulent domain name is close enough to the real thing to fool many targets.

Editorial Staff
Publication: 

There's rarely anything new in Spam Scams but the letter that purports to come from "Investigation and Enforcement Services" and carries a (not exactly correct) UK Government Copyright Notice is novel. Read the full mail below.

Editorial Staff
Publication: 

In the past few hours, a high-volume phishing scam, purporting to be from Bank Negara Malaysia, has hit inboxes. That is it a scam is without doubt: the outgoing addresses are all, in common with many such scams, .edu addresses. They contain a PDF file, BNM.pdf, as an attachment which does not trigger anti-virus warnings when it is delivered to inboxes.

Editorial Staff
BIScom Subsection: 

Fraudsters rely on illusion. They depend on showing you something so that you do not recognise a truth that they want to obscure.

Many fraudsters are clever, many are well prepared, but the vast majority are opportunists ..

CoNet Administrator
Publication: 
Editorial Staff

If it's got lies in it, it's a spam and putting an address or unsub link doesn't turn lies into truth. But really, one should be able to trust someone promoting "bible verses," right?

Nope.

 


 

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