Log In | Subscribe | | |

spam

This weekend has been an interesting weekend for spam, not the least of which is because such a large amount got through our first line filters: far more than usual. But they were all stopped at the second line of defence and as we trawled through the blocked messages, we came across several that were worthy of comment. One is that old chestnut, the United Nations scam; another is the latest example from a spam-house that now allows us to identify their server farm and it is particularly interesting because it appears to promote a scheme that fell under the bus when the British tax authorities began action in relation to that scheme. And then there's the special mention of the persistent finditeasy.info which is just the most blatant spam-scam that it's hard to understand how they think it will pass any filter. And there's more....

CoNet Section: 

We can't even be bothered to write about this amazing spam-scam. Just read it and weep - tears of laughter. Alexandra, supposedly at supportf@finditeasy.info, you are hereby nominated for a prize at the annual spam-scam awards.

FCRO Subsection: 

We've had enough of spam from a group of servers that is being a serious nuisance. And they all have one thing in common: they are investment related, in one form or another.

Working on the assumption that, if all victims adopt this policy spammers can be at least a little frustrated, this is what we have written to the company hosting the servers because, by reducing the business the ISP can do, there may be some pressure to be brought to bear on them to prevent their servers being used for spam.

CoNet Section: 

The return of the high-volume spammer and spammers who use proxy servers while using many different domain names means that the more common "block sender" spam control is less effective against them than against the relatively ad hoc spammer. But there is something you can do.

A carefully addressed but badly worded e-mail spam has arrived and it's got the potential to suck in many users across organisations.

CoNet Section: 

If the domain name used to send a spam and the subject line are inconsistent, that's often a guide to the probability that a the spam is also a scam. If the subject matter of the content is unrelated to a domain name that indicates a connection to a specific subject, that is also an indicator. So digital@myrountrips.net writing about "Multiple revenue streams" and "The Most Profitable Digital Currency System in the World" ticks more than enough boxes. Then we are promised no-lose crypto-currency trading.

We've introduced this same spam-scammer over the past few days and it's still at it. This time, however, there's no doubt what it's up to: it's trying to sell fixed return investments without any of the statutory information that's required for such promotions. But,then again, why bother complying with financial sector laws when the whole enterprise shows the signs of being fundamentally illegal?

FCRO Subsection: 

Somewhere, a new spam-scam factory is pumping out new schemes at the rate of one every couple of days.

They introduce via a domain name that has nothing to do with whatever they are using as the hook for the scam, but they do have certain things in common which enable us to identify them as sourced by the same spam-scam crew. Today's is from philstudio.net under the banner "Portfolio Direct" and is headed "Free guide to direct lending."

FCRO Subsection: 

As low-cost mortgage schemes and Pump and Dump scams return to the internet, there's more proof that frauds are cyclical. Today sees the gold spam we've seen in a while. And it even offers a "standby letter of credit."

FCRO Subsection: 

Remember This ("Taboola's big marketing fail") from a few days ago? Well, incredibly, they have compounded their ludicrous campaign with this...

CoNet Section: 

Wherever you are in the world, the so-called Nigerian Scam is alive and well and yesterday's notice from the USA's Internal Revenue Service is the release that will launch a thousand scams - and probably many, many more. It's so serious that the subject line in the e-mail from the IRS raised spam / scam alerts in the Vortex Centrum monitoring system, which can't be good.

FCRO Subsection: 

There's a lot of dispute over exactly what constitutes "spam" with legislation influenced by the advertising and marketing industry often defining the term far more narrowly than the public at large. Whether it's legally spam or not, one thing happens far more than it should in unsolicited advertising. That thing is where the e-mail is dishonest in some respect ranging from fake senders through misleading content to out and out lies. The basic rule for recipients is simple: if a mail fails a simple test - "is it true?" - the only safe option is to bin it and block the sender.

CoNet Section: 

The email is doomed to be subject to review because the idiot sender has spoofed the recipient's address and used it as the sender's address. But, otherwise, for the unwary, in the period leading up to critical gift delivery period, the scam has a high chance of success.

CoNet Section: 

Thanks to all the scammers who make is sooooo easy to send their mails to the bin unread.

But we've been digging around in the spam-trap because sometimes we find things that make us smile.

Here's this week's SPAM AWARDS

A new form of spam-scam has come to our attention. We understand that this has not been widely seen before. Its nature is that it is likely that many receiving the email will click on links.

CoNet Section: 

Pages

 


 

Amazon ads

 

When a loved-one dies, we don't know how to feel, we don't know how to react and we don't know how to behave. "Ten Things You Need To Know About Dealing With Death" is a quick and easy description of ten simple "Rules" that guide you through the grieving process, in the immediate aftermath of a death, in a practical and sometimes humorous way.

 

More information