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terrorism

As actual and threatened famine spreads across Africa, aid schemes are struggling to get funding for relief. But that's only a part of the story. The real - and hidden problem - is where the famines are. That's a major risk for governments, aid agencies, charities and individual donors. Worse, the crisis is going to amplify existing problems.

Business information service provider Thompson Reuters has agreed to issue an apology and to pay damages to the Finsbury Park Mosque in a case that has great implications for the financial sector and its data providers, particularly in relation to so-called "due diligence" databases, in this case the World-Check database that the company bought, as a going concern, in 2011. Read more for how this creates problems for FCROs.

We would not usually jump to the conclusion that any offence is an example of terrorism but in the case of the attack on a Christmas market in Berlin, just metres from the doorstep of the Berliner Morgenpost newspaper, seems unlikely to be anything else. And it's cost a few euros to mount, if the facts so far emerging are accurate.

It is unfortunate that, in the USA, the word terrorism is so easily bandied about that it has all but lost its meaning. A year ago, a mass killing occurred, but there remains no definitive evidence that the attack was, in fact, motivated by ideology which is a requirement for it to be classified as terrorism. Prosecutors and media must be more careful in their choice of words.

CoNet Section: 

 

World Money Laundering Report Volume 15 Number 5 World Money Laundering Report Volume 15 Number 5 is now available for download by Site Licence holders.

In this issue:

 

Editorial Staff

According to a report in an Israeli blog, Da'esh (it calls it ISIS) is "terrified" of a 39 year old woman who leads group that identifies Da'esh members and kills them. Of itself, the primary interest should be that the gang is led by a woman who is standing up to a misogynistic and brutal force of oppression. But it is not: the article is about what she does with the bodies. Our interest is the nature of the comments made on the report and the degree of support her brutality has obtained.

The State Bank of Pakistan has long listed, in a schedule to anti-terrorist legislation, a number of proscribed groups. On 25 September 2016, a Sunday, the first day of the working week in Pakistan, it issued a notice to banks (but only banks) instructing them to freeze the assets of more than 2,000 named persons, individuals and entities, which it says are directly linked to the proscribed groups.

FCRO Subsection: 

The actions of Mohamed Lahouaiej-Bouhlel in driving a lorry into many people out for an evening watching Bastille Day fireworks, killing more than 80 and injuring many more, some seriously, was immediately branded an act of terrorism. It was terrible but it was not, necessarily, terrorism. Indeed, early signs were that it was not a terrorist attack in the normal sense of the word and as the story unfolds, it seems that his actions may not have been in the strict definition of terrorism. It's time to tone down the rhetoric and time to teach politicians and the media that they should not rush to use technical terms without a full understanding of what they mean - and how to prove them in Court.

FCRO Subsection: 

 

Morris-Cotterill The Ten Real Life Exploits Da'esh / ISIS use to Hack the World PUBLISHED March 2015 as a special issue of World Money Laundering Report Ten Exploits that Dae'sh / ISIS Use to Hack the World explains how Da'esh / ISIS has been able to become such a global force in such a short time and how the group has become the biggest threat to the world since the Ice Age.

The actions of terrorists are always unacceptable. But history shows that changing attitudes accept the results of terrorism and, in some cases, see the results as worthy of the action. As we come up to two weeks before the 12th anniversary of 11 September 2001, it is clear some, perhaps unintended, consequences may prove to be beneficial to the entire world, including Muslims.

A contentious thought: please set aside emotional considerations when reading.

CoNet Section: 

The UK has suffered its first fatal terrorist attack since 7 July 2007. Running people down, hacking down people large knives is so common in some parts of the world that it warrants a small note on the inside pages of newspapers. But those attacks are usually related to organised crime or some perceived personal slight. But the murderous attack in Woolwich in south-east London was neither of those.

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The bombing of the Boston Marathon gained justifiably widespread publicity. But it was not the biggest terrorist event of the long weekend, nor even the event which could have proved the most deadly. But another event went largely unnoticed by the "western" media. Why? It happened in Taiwan.Then there's the 16 killed in an attack in Pakistan.

CoNet Section: 

There is much talk of successes against terrorism, in part as the justification for placing restrictions on long- and hard-won freedoms from oppressive government. But as the bombs placed at the route for the Boston Marathon shows, identifying and containing terrorist threats is next to impossible.

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It really would be helpful if the USA would stop inventing new uses for existing terms: they did it with "billion" and "Orient," they get "protest" wrong and they really, really, really don't have a grip on "terrorism." But despite that, their warnings about "sovereign citizens" should not be ignored and financial institutions are in the front line.

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